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Archive for Change Management

“No person, no place, and no thing has any power over us, for ‘we’ are the only thinkers in our mind. When we create peace and harmony and balance our minds, we will find it in our lives.”  ~Louise Hay

One thing people tell me in my keynotes and seminars on leadership is that they are extremely overloaded with work and are desperately searching for effective ways to balance their lives. They realize it takes a great deal of energy and expertise to multitask their employees’ schedules, family plans, and still find time to take a breath for themselves. In order to achieve this ideal harmony, managers need to intentionally change their behavior, starting with incorporating these tips for a well-balanced and happier life.

Walk the Walk of a Balanced Life

In giving work-life balance tips for managers, I often tell leaders they need to be role models. If you say you want a good work-life balance but don’t put those words into action you will always disappoint your employees, your family and yourself. You will also lose all credibility. Employees will listen to what you say but are usually more impacted by what you actually do. If you are constantly at the office, never taking a vacation (or checking email when you do), then your message is clear, work is your only concern and they should follow suit. Instead, do your best to leave your work at the office and your personal life at home. Then you’ll be able to take time for your work, relationships, and own self-preservation and be perceived as a more rounded and well-adjusted leader.

Invest Time in Taking Care of Yourself

The best way to achieve a work-life balance is to invest in consistent self-care. This means making it a priority to eat healthier, exercise regularly and get enough sleep each night. While you may feel that you can get more done if you don’t take the time to invest in self-care, that choice will eventually catch up with you down the road. You can’t expect yourself or anyone else to perform at their peak if they don’t have the chance to energize each day. Start slow by eating a healthier lunch, schedule time to do a physical activity for 30 minutes a day and finish your day with a regular sleep schedule. Make a solid commitment and accept the fact that you won’t be nearly as productive if you always put yourself last.

Encourage a Flexible Workplace

It seems employee morale goes way up when flexible work schedules and telecommuting is a viable option. Whether it’s every Friday or a few days a week this flexibility will make both your lives easier! Of course you will know right away who is able to exercise this option responsibly and who is not. Most of your employees who are given this opportunity will be autonomous, self-motivated and productive.  This will create a happier workforce who will demonstrate their commitment to getting their work completed. Also, if you allow for paid time off in lieu of traditional sick days, vacation time, and personal days that will boost morale as well by giving your employees the chance to decide where and when they want to use it. Paid time off is a huge motivator and aids in the work-life balance for both managers and employees.

Unplug and Have Some Fun

No one gets to the end of their life wishing they had searched the Internet more. In fact, a few decades ago the Internet didn’t exist and people had to interact without the benefit of using a machine. Consider unplugging for a few hours, a day or even a weekend and enjoy the bliss of not being tied to a device such as a cell phone, tablet or email inbox. While this might be hard to do at first, you will find other activities that are just as satisfying. Consider seeing a comedy with an old friend, spending time eating dinner with loved ones and actually talking to each other. If you can arrange a day at the park to play some Frisbee or Softball and top it off with a picnic lunch you’ll create happy and lasting memories.

When you walk the walk of a balanced life, invest time in taking care of yourself, encourage a flexible workplace, and unplug to have fun, you will create a life that has greater harmony and purpose. Encompassing these work-life balance tips for managers and employees will result in a more satisfying career and family life that you both can enjoy and embrace!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is a workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon. Find more information at http://BounceBackHigher.com

3 Work-Life Balance Tips for Managers

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

After recently conducting a seminar on leadership, a number of people asked me for work-life balance tips for managers. In the coming days, I’ll be providing more ideas and maybe even an article on the subject. In the meantime, here are some easy work-life balance tips for managers and supervisors that you can apply today.

1. Make a conscious effort not to work beyond a certain time. For example, schedule in that you’ll complete all your tasks and head home by 6:00 pm. At some point, you have to turn off the technology and tune in to family and friends. More than that, make meeting with them your reward.

2. Keep your phone charger at work! This way, once the battery is gone, you’ll have no choice but to finish your calls for the day. A participant in one of my leadership seminars employs this technique and his family loves him for it.

3. Exercise. The best way to decompress is to get outdoors, take in the fresh air, and gain a new perspective. Research shows that just walking 10 to 15 minutes in the morning awakens your senses, wards off stress, and helps counteract “SAD,” or Seasonal Affective Disorder. You do not need sunlight, just daylight.

Getting outdoors for a brisk walk, even at lunchtime, is one of the best things you can do for yourself mentally, physically and emotionally. I live in the Pacific Northwest, and when I walk my dogs outdoors, I can attest to the boost in mood and energy!

One of the biggest work-life balance tips for managers? Learn to delegate. In your mind you may be thinking “Well, if I want it done right I might as well do it myself.” The truth is you have to learn to let go and–do I dare say it–relinquish some of the control.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS:Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 audio programs and the book SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

 

 

Find Change Agents That Get the Job Done

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

If we don’t change, we don’t grow. If we don’t grow, we aren’t really living. ~ Gail Sheehy

Managing change in organizations is not easy unless you have the right leadership in place. This is why finding the best change agents is essential for ensuring smooth transitions. You want to find people who have the right qualifications to move the company forward successfully. Identifying this type of leadership will make the process less stressful and give you the reassurance that goals will be met. However, finding those who are good at managing change in the workplace will also take some strategic planning. You can start by focusing on the top five qualities listed below to find strong leaders who will guide your company in the right direction.

Change Agents are Willing to Embrace New Ideas

Change is usually met with resistance because people are uncomfortable with the unknown. In my keynotes and seminars on managing change, I hear about it all the time! While this is to be expected, your change agents must not have this attitude. You want to find people who are excited about new ideas and willing to implement them with enthusiasm. Otherwise, you will have leaders who sabotage the process along the way. You also want change agents to be fully committed without any apprehension on their part. This will set the tone for others who are following these leaders and encourage them to work together toward the new goals.

Leaders Believe in the Big Picture of Growth

Managing change in the workplace effectively means that leaders must always have the big picture in their mind. The best companies are the ones that can grow to reflect the needs of their customers. Your employees might be in love with the same software they have used for the last five years; but if it doesn’t serve your increasing global customers, the business will be impacted. Leaders know how implementing changes will make their company grow and thrive. They also have the ability to communicate the big picture to their employees who can be confused and disappointed by new policies. By sharing this overall vision, the change agents will be more respected for making sure everyone understands the importance of the latest modifications.

Striving for Results Fuels Their Motivation

When it comes to managing change in organizations, staying on task is what great change agents do best. They are the first ones to realize that results will fuel their motivation and also increase their employees’ productivity. Especially when the changes that take longer to implement can be frustrating to employees who are relying on workarounds to get things done. Understanding this can happen; effective change agents will highlight benchmarks as progress is being made. They might also propose incentives that encourage their employees to meet milestones sooner which will make the goals more manageable.

Courage Comes Easily to Change Agents

Change agents who show courage will have the easiest time achieving their goals. They know it is not a matter of if a conflict will stand in their path but when it will appear. They are never afraid by this prospect and instead seize the opportunity to obtain a quick resolution. They are also attentive when managing change in the workplace because they know their demeanor is being evaluated by their employees! If they act uncertain or get easily distressed by obstacles, then others will be hesitant in following them. Good change agents know that staying calm and focused on the end result will make each conflict a temporary diversion that can be successfully rectified.

They Gain Trust and Develop Buy-In Successfully

Since change is usually a scary undertaking, employees want to follow people they can trust. When change agents are trusted by their employees, goals align and buy-in is achieved. Even though those relationships take time to establish, leaders can build a solid foundation by regularly communicating to their employees. Change agents will take extra time to share the overall vision and identify each employee’s specific role in achieving successful results. They will also select leaders within each group to assist them in establishing buy-in. This will reinforce the idea that employees are part of the change instead of something randomly happening to them.

Managing change in organizations takes the right leaders, process and perseverance to succeed. When all of these components are applied correctly you will develop an organization that not only survives transitions but also prospers. Hang in there!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

Four Tips for Selling Change in the Workplace

Friday, August 30th, 2013

Growth demands a temporary surrender of security.
~Gail Sheehy

Change is not only inevitable; it’s necessary! Without change, your organization can’t grow. It can’t take advantage of new opportunities. It can’t remain competitive. However, it’s natural for your employees to fear change. The unknown is scary! To make your organizational change as effectively and efficiently as possible, an important part of managing change is selling change in the workplace. Following are four tips to help make this process easier.

  1. Make Sure Employees are Aware of the Change Necessity. Although the reason for change may be obvious to you, it might not be so obvious to your employees! If you want to sell the change as part of effective change management, make sure you not only tell your employees what the change is going to be, but also tell them the why behind it. Share with them how the change will benefit the organization, as a whole, and even them directly.

  2. Choose the Best Time. Timing is everything – that includes selling change in the workplace. If it can be timed correctly, you’ll minimize the amount of resistance to the impending change. Think about the other things going on in your organization and what key organizational members have on their plates whose buy-in you really need.

  3. Support. Support. Support. There will always be naysayers to any proposed change. The best way to sell change to these folks is to have support to back up the necessity and the value of your proposed change. You can never have too much documentation to support your change. When developing this documentation, try to anticipate what challenges others will bring to light against your organizational change. There are usually always downsides to every change; however, develop support to show that the rewards to the change outweigh any potential downsides.

  4. Be passionate. The best salespeople believe in what they’re selling. This is just as true for selling organizational change as it is for selling tangible products! Be passionate about the change you want to implement and the value it offers the organization. You should be the champion of this change! Your passion, enthusiasm and commitment will be inspirational to others and help make the buy-in to this change that much easier.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

 


“A company’s culture is often buried so deeply inside rituals, assumptions, attitudes, and values that it becomes transparent to an organization’s members only when, for some reason, it changes.”

~Rob Goffee

Organizational culture is an interdependent set of goals, values, visions, processes, attitudes, assumptions, and roles. When a leader wishes to make a change to the organizational culture, this can be one of the most difficult undertakings. The interdependent facets of the culture serve to reinforce themselves and actively work to prevent change. Following are four common mistakes made when changing organizational culture.

  1. Relying on coercion – One of the most common mistakes leaders make when trying to change an organization’s culture is the use of coercion to garner buy-in and acceptance from their employees. You can’t force people to think or feel a certain way. Instead, you should foster the acceptance of the change by sharing your vision of the new organizational culture and inspiring them to accept it voluntarily. Allow them to envision what the future of the organization will be like once the new organizational culture is in place, and the benefits this new culture will bring for not only the organization but themselves as well!
  2. Failure to use management tools – For those who have inspired their employees to accept and support this organizational culture change, the second most common mistake is failure to put in place management tools that will help facilitate the cultural change. These management tools need to support the new goals, values, visions, processes, attitudes, assumptions, and roles of the new culture. From new role definitions to new measurement and control systems, without these tools in place, the changes made will likely be short-lived.
  3. Lack of communication – As with any change management strategy, communication is key, yet it is surprising lack of communication is still a common mistake. For changing organizational culture, this communication shouldn’t just be top-down communication. Instead, communication should be handled horizontally and with discussions rather than demands. Continue to share and discuss the new culture and the vision of this new culture, reinforcing its value to the entire organization and each individual.
  4. Starting too harshly – Although you may be eager to get the new organizational culture in place, don’t go at it like a bull in a China shop. Don’t immediately start by reorganizing the company. This will only serve to cause people to dig their heels in deeper and work against the cultural change you’re trying to implement. Also, bringing in a new team of executives right off the bat will sour people on the cultural change, as they feel their position within the organization and potential advancement are threatened. However, the one thing you DO want to do quickly is put in place the new systems and processes to support the new cultural vision. Don’t hesitate on that aspect, or you will see your unsupported cultural change falter!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

Developing Change Leaders

Thursday, February 28th, 2013


Change is the law of life and those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.

~ John F. Kennedy

In many industries, the only way to remain competitive is to change – and often change rapidly. As Mark Sanborn once said, “Your success in life isn’t based on your ability to simply change. It is based on your ability to change faster than your competition, customers and business.” Change doesn’t happen typically by itself, though. Who is going to lead this critical change in your organization?

This is where a Change Leader comes into play!

What is a Change Leader?

A Change Leader is an employee, appointed by the executive sponsor of the change initiative, who provides the daily leadership, coordination and enthusiasm needed for change management. A Change Leader’s normal duties may be scaled back, in order for them to have the time to address the needs of the change management process. Additionally, a Change Leader has the duty and the power to motivate employees at all levels of the organization, to ensure the change project is completed.

How to Develop Change Leaders

There are certain traits that accompany effective Change Leaders. Change Leaders are typically positive and upbeat. They are “do’ers,” taking action when action is needed. They are emotionally stable and do not let the challenges of the job at hand get them down. Effective Change Leaders are open, outgoing and friendly. Lastly, Change Leaders are confident in not only their abilities but also in the projects they adopt, knowing they will succeed!

Following are ways to develop these key traits and create effective Change Leaders in your organization.

  • Change management training – To be effective, your Change Leader needs to understand the basic principles and theories behind change management. Additionally, they need to be able to utilize the tools and mechanisms that will be important in successfully implementing the change.

  • Build on natural talents – When selecting which employees to develop into Change Leaders, look at their natural, soft skill sets. Look for those employees who have an optimistic attitude and who like to get involved. Employees who are willing to head up projects and are eager to make a real difference in the company are excellent candidates to develop into Change Leaders!

  • Use mentors – Form mentor relationships between the developing Change Leader and key executives. This will help them learn what has worked in the past when implementing change, and what hasn’t. Executives can give real world examples of changes that have already been implemented and help them avoid some of the pitfalls.

  • Network your Change Leaders – Having a network of other organizational Change Leaders a developing Change Leader can learn from and turn to is a significant resource. When challenges or questions arise, being able to turn to other Change Leaders for advice or assistance is invaluable.

In the end, by developing Change Leaders in the organization, you can help ensure changes are implemented as effectively and efficiently as possible, keeping you one step ahead of your competition!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

 

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

People don’t resist change. They resist being changed!
~Peter Senge

With the turmoil and challenges that can occur during times of change, for organizations, it’s not uncommon for employees to “look for greener pastures.” How do organizations retain their employees during times of change? Following are four ways to keep your employees around for the long haul.

  1. Money - To stave off a mass exodus of key people, some organizations try the age-old strategy of throwing money at the employees they feel that can’t afford to lose. Although money is a significant motivator, especially when tied into the end result of the change, in today’s economic times, it may not be financially feasible for an organization to do this.
  2. Opportunity – For many employees, opportunity to grow and build their career is even more important than a few extra dollars in their paycheck. Tying opportunities, in the form of increased responsibilities and/or promotions, with the successful completion of the change not only helps retain those employees, but also gives them a vested interest in the change’s success.
  3. Development – For those who are not in the position to receive promotions or immediate career advancement opportunities, career development programs, as an incentive to remain with the company, are often effective. Although not a direct advancement, the employee values the education and experience they are receiving via the development program, and they understand it will eventually help advance their career.
  4. Appreciation – It may seem like commonsense that showing people how much they and their efforts are appreciated, especially during times of change, is critical to retaining employees. However, for many business leaders, the day-to-day tasks, coupled with the newly added challenges of change management, mean showing appreciation is too often forgotten. Showing your appreciation won’t just help retain your employees, but it will also motivate them to be even more productive in the future.

Targeting those employees who are critical to retain is an important part of the development of effective retention incentive programs. Don’t simply look at the Top Gun employees. Instead consider which positions are going to be most instrumental in implementing the change and ensuring it gets off on the right foot.

Also, understand that not all employees are alike. For this reason, a “one-size-fits-all” approach likely will not work for everyone. Instead, think about a combination of financial and non-financial incentives tailored to the individual employee for the greatest success!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

 

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

Dealing with Difficult People…

Friday, February 26th, 2010
What We Can Learn from Dogs!
By Colleen Kettenhofen

“It’s not about being better than others. It’s about becoming better with ourselves.”
Colleen Kettenhofen

     As you know, your rockiest relationships can serve as your greatest teachers. Mine certainly have. Sometimes we learn how we never want to be from observing other people.

     Many of the proven principles in my dealing with difficult people programs have come from personal experience. I’ve learned to make lemons from some pretty sour people. Fortunately, you discover through trial and error how to deal with these difficult people. And if you’re like me, you’ve been lucky. You haven’t had to deal with too many difficult people. And my background is in sales. There’s a profession where sometimes you’re dealing with difficult people!

     What gave me a new leash on life was first looking at what might be my part. Then recognizing what aspect is about them. Chronically difficult people are often unhappy people. Misery loves company. Don’t accept the invitation. Because if we’re still analyzing and dissecting everything they’ve said a week later, they control us. Here’s a great mantra for you to silently say to yourself the next time you’re dealing with difficult people: “THIS is a test. This is ONLY a test. This will NOT be important in 10 yrs!” Chances are it won’t be important even 10 weeks from now.

     Understand where this difficult person in your life is coming from. In dealing with difficult people, know it’s often a dark place of deep insecurity. They make themselves feel better by belittling you. Don’t fall prey to their disparaging remarks. Pretend you’re a duck. Let their comments fall off your back like water and roll into the gutter where they belong. Say to yourself, “I’m am a duck. I am a duck. Your stuff rolls off my back like water and into the gutter where it belongs.”

     Don’t communicate too much to “stand your ground.” You’ll only fan the flames of contentiousness. Don’t add fuel to an already explosive fire. Detach and move away from the fire. Otherwise, it’s YOU who gets burned.

     You’ve heard people say that you can discover a lot from dogs. My dog, Joy, is a bright shining light in a sometimes dark world. For example, it’s amazing to see the joy (pardon the pun) on people’s faces when they see her wet nose and wagging tail. She lives up to her name.

     My mom, Janet, used to say “We can learn how to treat people from dogs.” She would exclaim, “They’re happy to see you. They show appreciation, kindness and love to almost everyone they meet.” My mother was this way. (Kind of get a lump in my throat hearing her voice and feeling her presence!) I want to emulate Janet. And I want to be like Joy. Observing Joy causes me to reflect and ask the question, “How much light do I want to have bring into this world?” Ask yourself the same question. How can you bring hope, healing, and happiness to others? Just like dogs.

     The challenge in dealing with difficult people is this: Not only do they lack bringing light, difficult people are experts at snuffing out your candle flame. They know all the right buttons to press if you’re not wearing your bulletproof vest. They steal your joy and hijack your spirit. Difficult people suck the life out of you…which is why they’re called Emotional Vampires. Don’t let them drive you batty!

Good luck to you!

Sign up for Colleen’s free e-newsletter on change, stress management, overcoming adversity, dealing with difficult people, managing difficult people, presentation skills and more: http://www.ColleenSpeaks.com/newsletter.htm

Watch speaker Colleen Kettenhofen’s video clips instantly at http://www.ColleenSpeaks.com/kettenhofen_video.htm

For Colleen Kettenhofen’s articles on leadership, life balance, overcoming adversity, dealing with difficult people, increasing sales, presentation skills and more: http://www.ColleenSpeaks.com/freearticles.htm

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for seminars, keynotes and breakout sessions by calling (623)340-7690 or, toll free (800)323-0683.

Colleen has two NEW books being published in June 2010.

Sermons We See, September 30, 2009

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

I conducted a keynote address at a Nebraska conference yesterday on leadership, managing people, and being an effective role model.  The key to winning respect and being a person of influence is not so much in what you say as in what you do. I read “Sermons We See,” and the audience loved it as it illustrates the importance of practicing what you preach:

Sermons We See

I’d rather see a sermon than hear one any day,
I’d rather one should walk with me than merely show the way.
The eye’s a better pupil and more willing than the ear;
Fine counsel is confusing, but example’s always clear;
And the best of all the preachers are the men who live their creeds,
For to see the good in action is what everybody needs.
I can soon learn how to do it if you’ll let me see it done.
I can watch your hands in action, but your tongue too fast may run.
And the lectures you deliver may be very wise and true;
But I’d rather get my lesson by observing what you do.
For I may misunderstand you and the high advice you give,
But there’s no misunderstanding how you act and how you live.

~ Edgar A. Guest
The Light of Faith

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for seminars, keynotes and breakout sessions by calling (623)340-7690 or, toll free (800)323-0683.

Sign up for Colleen’s free e-newsletter on leadership, life balance/overcoming adversity, dealing with difficult people, managing people, presentation skills and more: http://www.ColleenSpeaks.com/newsletter.htm

Watch speaker Colleen Kettenhofen’s video clips instantly at http://www.ColleenSpeaks.com/kettenhofen_video.htm

For Colleen Kettenhofen’s articles on leadership, life balance, dealing with difficult people, managing people, presentation skills and more: http://www.ColleenSpeaks.com/freearticles.htm

Risk

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

When we’re considering taking a risk, sometimes all we need is a little encouragement. Often, the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing. Here’s a great saying:

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Categories : Change Management