To schedule Colleen, please call:
(971) 212-0479
in Portland, Oregon

Archive for Leadership, Management – Page 2

Managing Conflict in the Workplace

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. ~ Thomas Paine

One of the most frequent questions I get asked is, “What are some tips for managing conflict in the workplace?” This is because most managers want to know how to fend off major issues before they escalate. And even in the most congenial work environment, conflicts will occur. But this doesn’t have to create a sense of impending doom! When you effectively use the energy from conflicts in the workplace they also have the ability to transform your problems into opportunities. In fact, by incorporating the following steps your conflicts can become more manageable and take your problem solving methods to a whole new level.

Cool Heads Prevail During Times of Conflict in the Workplace

Conflicts get messy and complicated when they are steeped with emotion. Why? Both sides are passionate about their point of view and want to win! When someone is personally invested in winning they tend to lose sight of everything else. If things get too heated, this is when business relationships can be severely damaged. Bringing both sides together to discuss issues in a reasonable way will allow solutions to flourish. Additionally, separating the person from the issue will encourage discussion rather than arguments and debates.

When Managing Conflict in the Workplace, Encourage Proactive Problem Solving

When your employees start focusing on proactive solutions that’s when conflicts start to fade and problem solving thrives. Encourage and listen to all ideas and solutions. Create an environment that supports teamwork and discourages superficial criticism. If someone does drift back to their original position, ask them why other options couldn’t be considered. This gives each person a chance to carefully consider their proposals in an objective way.  When managing conflict in the workplace, the more reasonable you are in finding solutions, the better opportunity you will have in garnering a compromise.

Objectively Analyze the Situation

It’s easy to have lots of ideas but finding out how viable they are usually takes extensive research. Ask your employees to get more details about costs, timelines and contingency plans. This will also give them the ability to see if a particular process is possible while they are looking for the best solution. Encouraging your employees to fill in these details also fosters ownership of the process. As they gain perspective, some of their original objections will be resolved and lose their power in preventing progress.

Find Out What Works and Build From There

As employees go through the conflict resolution process they will discover that cooperation is the best path towards successful results. When they demonstrate good teamwork, tell them specifically what actions you appreciate. Giving this consistent and positive feedback will likely guide them into a mindset that thinks more about the team and less about their own interests. If they get off track a bit, then point out why the goal of resolving the issue is important to the organization.

As a motivational speaker, I see many employees who think they are a team when in fact they are just a work group. They haven’t been coached into a “we” mentality. One of the keys to successfully managing conflict in the workplace is steering them away from the “me” mindset.

Have a Definite Resolution

You might encounter a situation where multiple solutions are equally good. However, if they all can’t be implemented then a choice has to be made. Often, your leadership position gives you the advantage of knowing what upper management would support. Once the final choice is made, briefly explain your reasons to your employees and stick to your decision. When managing conflict in the workplace, consistency is key. Unresolved conflicts will keep things unsettled, you’ll appear passive, and nothing will move forward. Even if the final choice isn’t celebrated by everyone, at least it gives closure to the conflict and that will be appreciated by the majority.

Managing conflict in  the workplace isn’t easy, but with your assistance it can ultimately create a more cooperative, cohesive atmosphere for everyone!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows across the country and has written more than 40+ popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

You don’t lead by hitting people over the head–that’s assault, not leadership. ~Dwight Eisenhower

The first day a new employee arrives at your office is often mixed with excitement and uncertainty. And you both want the same result — success. But this will only happen if you use your effective leadership skills to initiate the groundwork for developing their unique talents. Starting out on the right foot will give your employee the blueprint they need to be a top contributor and you the reassurance they are following the right path.

Here are five of the most effective ways to start achieving success beginning with their first day:

Make Your Expectations Clear and Detailed

Nothing will make your employee happier than knowing where you stand. Remember, they are working at your company to help you! But in order to achieve your goals they need to know what success looks like in your eyes. During that first meeting be clear about their role in the company, what you are trying to achieve and when it all needs to be accomplished. Don’t be vague. Set clear standards from the beginning and give your employee specific examples they can follow. It will take time to put in this extra effort but you’ll be laying a solid foundation to get the results you really want. In my leadership seminars, one of the most common takeaways is managers realizing they need to set more quantifiable standards for their employees.

Provide a Way to Give and Receive Feedback

Feedback is crucial to ensure the quality of the work you receive. As you are working with your new hire tell them what works well and how they can improve. As the boss, you have the advantage of knowing when something hasn’t worked before and how to quickly resolve those issues. Also, when your employee has questions or concerns tell them how to approach you. Do you have an open door policy? Or do you prefer getting all of their questions in a single email. Determine what process works best for you and clearly communicate your preferences so they can be implemented. It’s one of the secrets to practicing effective leadership.

Managing Conflict in the Workplace

Conflicts come with every project and how you handle it will determine how smoothly things are resolved. Encourage your employees to solve smaller conflicts on their own and be supportive when they need additional leadership from you. When managing conflict in the workplace, actively listen to their concerns and urge their input for a resolution to the situation. If other people are providing the conflict, arrange for a group meeting to discuss the various issues and find common ground. Most importantly, show your employee they have your full support for resolving difficult situations and also troubleshooting any future issues. It’s one of the keys to successfully managing conflict in the workplace.

How to Appreciate and Encourage Employees

Effective leadership means not only pointing out the problems but also the successes. A thoughtful thank you goes a long way to show that you appreciate your employee’s efforts. Being specific about what you liked about their work will inspire the same results later. Additionally, acknowledge when they overcome difficult situations so they can see that you empathize with their struggles. Any opportunity you have to publicly acknowledge their success or give them a special award will also encourage others on your team to achieve similar results. Over time give employees the opportunity to lead and encourage others by becoming a group leader on future projects.

Motivating and Inspiring Employees Toward Top Results

Every employee has a special skill or ability they enjoy doing. It is usually some task they would like to do even if they weren’t  getting paid! It takes effective leadership skills to determine what these abilities are and to assign them to the right person. If you have the choice to give an accounting task to someone who likes doing math problems in their spare time, why not encourage them to crunch some numbers for you? Maybe they would like to get their degree and pursue this type of work in the future. Finding the balance between what is beneficial for your company and the future aspirations of your employee will help both of you achieve success.

Engaging these strategies will help assure the first day with your new employee will be one of many that encourage a solid working relationship that can build and develop in the future!

 

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows across the country and has written more than 40+ articles on diverse workplace issues. She has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries.

She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen can assist your organization with successful leadership development through her keynotes, seminars, and workshops. Be sure to visit www.BounceBackHigher.com for details or call (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

 

 

 

Four Tips for Selling Change in the Workplace

Friday, August 30th, 2013

Growth demands a temporary surrender of security.
~Gail Sheehy

Change is not only inevitable; it’s necessary! Without change, your organization can’t grow. It can’t take advantage of new opportunities. It can’t remain competitive. However, it’s natural for your employees to fear change. The unknown is scary! To make your organizational change as effectively and efficiently as possible, an important part of managing change is selling change in the workplace. Following are four tips to help make this process easier.

  1. Make Sure Employees are Aware of the Change Necessity. Although the reason for change may be obvious to you, it might not be so obvious to your employees! If you want to sell the change as part of effective change management, make sure you not only tell your employees what the change is going to be, but also tell them the why behind it. Share with them how the change will benefit the organization, as a whole, and even them directly.

  2. Choose the Best Time. Timing is everything – that includes selling change in the workplace. If it can be timed correctly, you’ll minimize the amount of resistance to the impending change. Think about the other things going on in your organization and what key organizational members have on their plates whose buy-in you really need.

  3. Support. Support. Support. There will always be naysayers to any proposed change. The best way to sell change to these folks is to have support to back up the necessity and the value of your proposed change. You can never have too much documentation to support your change. When developing this documentation, try to anticipate what challenges others will bring to light against your organizational change. There are usually always downsides to every change; however, develop support to show that the rewards to the change outweigh any potential downsides.

  4. Be passionate. The best salespeople believe in what they’re selling. This is just as true for selling organizational change as it is for selling tangible products! Be passionate about the change you want to implement and the value it offers the organization. You should be the champion of this change! Your passion, enthusiasm and commitment will be inspirational to others and help make the buy-in to this change that much easier.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

 

The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.
~Thomas Paine

Employee conflict is inevitable. Put a group of people together and it’s not uncommon for the myriad of personalities to clash from time-to-time. Your main priority when this happens is to manage the employee disagreement without escalating the situation.

Monitoring Employee Disagreements:

Your first duty to managing employee disagreements is to monitor the situation. Even if the dispute seems petty, be aware of what is going on. Keep your eyes and ears on the situation. The employees involved may be able to come to a resolution on their own. In fact, it’s often better if they can come to an understanding on their own; however, if it begins to negatively impact their performance or if there’s a danger the situation may escalate, you’ll want to quickly step in.

Mediation in Employee Disagreements:

If the employee disagreement lingers or escalates, it’s time for you to step in. However, at this point, it’s not your job to make a decision for them. As a mediator, set up a neutral location for the parties involved to discuss the dispute. Set ground rules (such as taking turns speaking) and help everyone involved express their side of the disagreement to one another. Give each party equal time to speak. Let them brainstorm ideas for resolution – something that creates a compromise amongst the parties.

Resolution of Employee Disagreements:

Sometimes an employee disagreement simply can’t come to a resolution by the employees on their own, even with the help of a mediator. This is where you, as the manager, must step in. It is your duty to protect the best interests of your organization, and to come up with a solution to the conflict that is the best strategically for your company. If possible, try to come up with a win-win situation for everyone. This may not be possible though, and it may mean one party is more satisfied with the resolution than the other, or it may mean both parties are unhappy. However, present the solution based on facts and why it’s in the best interest of the organization, and therefore in the best interest of all employees.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Confidence

Friday, August 2nd, 2013

Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.
~ Helen Keller

Although there are those who cross the line from confident into overconfident, many of us still have some challenges with self-confidence, at least at some point in time in our careers. Even if we’re secure in our positions, things can happen that make us doubt ourselves and our abilities. Following our five ways to strengthen your confidence.

  1. Take Stock in Yourself – When self-doubt begins to creep in, honestly take stock in yourself, your experience and your abilities. You’re in the position you’re in because of your hard work and your talents. It’s not a fluke. When new challenges arise that you worry you can’t handle, think back to the other challenges in your past that you’ve overcome. Remind yourself of the times in the past that seemed insurmountable, but you persevered!

  2. Believe in Yourself, Even When You Don’t – There is an old saying – “Fake it until you make it.” When you find your confidence slipping, fake it. Act with confidence, even when you’re not feeling overly confident. Before you know it, the “confidence act” will be reality.

  3. Mitigate Your Weaknesses – No matter how amazing you are, everyone has weaknesses. Its these weaknesses that usually are the biggest source of our insecurities. Acknowledge what areas you’re not as strong in and find ways to address them. This can include delegating tasks to employees who excel in the areas you’re not as strong in, or getting training or education in areas you’d like to be stronger. Both of these can turn your weaknesses into strengths.

  4. Bounce Back When Mistakes Happen – No one is perfect. No one. At some point, we all make mistakes. Don’t let this eat away your self-confidence when mistakes happen. Instead, find out where you went wrong then take steps to not make the same mistake ever again.

  5. Remember to Be Thankful – When insecurity makes you worry if you’re good enough, take a moment to be thankful. Acknowledge and appreciate all of skills and talents you do have. Focusing on the positive and not the negative can help you feel more secure.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

Moving from Buddy to Boss

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

Leaders must be close enough to relate to others, but far enough ahead to motivate them.”
~ John C. Maxwell

Friendships with your employees – when, if ever, is it appropriate? This is one of the most difficult questions for managers to answer. From an academic HR standpoint, the answer is often cut and dry – It’s never appropriate. However, in the real world, it’s often not that simple.

Relationships between between simply can’t be governed by corporate policy. Managers are not unfeeling robots. It’s only natural, after spending time, day in and day out, with people that there are going to be some people you like. In fact, to move from manager to a true leader, you need to be supportive and caring with your employees. However, does this mean it’s OK to be both buddy and boss?

In a word – no.

Although you do want to develop a trusting relationship based on mutual respect, between yourself and your employees, there still needs to be well-defined boundaries. You may be “friendly.” but you are, in the end, their boss, first and foremost. Here are four reasons why you have to move away from “buddy” if you’re the boss.

  1. Even if your actions and treatment of a person are completely unbiased, if they are your friend, others will perceive anything favorable as favoritism.

  2. Even when you’re trying to be unbiased in the treatment of your employees, you may subconsciously treat those who are your friends more favorably. It’s a natural tendency to treat people we have a personal relationship better than those we don’t.

  3. It is difficult to fully fulfill the duties of manager, when the employee in question is a friend. This includes – honest reviews, disciplinary actions, even firing the friend.

  4. You open up your company to potential lawsuits. Each time your friend receives favorable treatment (raise, promotion, etc.), even if it’s well-deserved, you risk a discrimination lawsuit from the other employees. Even if your company wins the suit, the process is often costly.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

You don’t need a title to be a leader.
~ Multiple Attributions

You may have learned important skills while you were in school; however, chances are, they didn’t teach you how to be a leader. Although technical skills are important, they’re only a part of your career development puzzle. Leadership skills are what will set you apart from the pack and boost you to the top of your career field. This is why leadership skills development is so important, and everyone has room for improvement.

Practice Good Listening Skills for Leadership Skills Development

If you want to be an effective leader, where people listen to you, you need to begin by listening to them. One of the most important areas of leadership skills development is improving your listening skills. When you listen to someone, give them your full attention, ask questions to confirm you’re hearing what they’re saying correctly, and watch your body language.

Take Initiative for Chances to Develop Your Leadership Skills

Leadership skills development also involves taking the initiative to take on leadership roles. Although you may be assigned leadership positions that can help you improve your skills, don’t wait for others to offer these opportunities. Volunteer for projects, both within your job scope and for multifunctional projects, and take the lead role to get leadership experience. Even if you’re already in a leadership position, by leading new people, you learn ways to deal with different personalities and challenges.

Great Leadership Inspires Others

Inspiring others is another key step in leadership skills development. The difference between a manager and a true leader is this – A manager tells people what to do and ensures it is done. A leader inspires people to want to things that need to be done. Inspire those around you. Learn what motivates them. Recognize when others are having challenges, and address these and encourage them to persevere. Always serve as a good example.

Never Stop Learning for Career-Long Leadership Skills Development

I don’t care if you’ve been in your career two years or 22 years – never stop learning! From industry specific knowledge to dealing with difficult employees, there is always new knowledge out there for you to learn and continue in your journey of leadership skills development. Never become so arrogant to think there is nothing more you can learn. Continuously challenge yourself, and you’ll find your career that much better for it.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

Improving Staff Retention

Thursday, June 27th, 2013


There are two things people want more than sex and money… recognition and praise.
~
Mary Kay Ash

Hiring great people is a critical part of ensuring your organization’s success. However, if you’re unable to retain those amazing employees, they’ll do your company little good. In fact, losing good staff not only costs your organization time and money, when trying to fill those open positions, but high employee turnover will also damage your team’s morale! Following are five tips to help you improve your staff retention.

  1. Be Competitive – This should go without saying, paying your employees competitively is critical to improving staff retention. Sometimes long-time employees’ compensation falls out of line with the going market rate, especially if your company has withheld raises in recent years, due to the challenging economy. When this happens, don’t be surprised if your best people are recruited out from under your nose.

  2. Little Things Mean A Lot – In addition to competitive compensation, don’t forget about the importance of other small perks. Providing doughnuts on Mondays, free gym memberships or the ability to partially telecommute cost very little, in the grand scheme of things, but can mean a lot when you’re talking about improving staff retention.

  3. Promote from Within – Many of your best employees have career goals they want to achieve. Help them achieve these goals and keep them loyal to your company, When your employees feel they’re in a dead-end position, that’s when they’ll start looking for employment elsewhere.

  4. Have Fun – All work and no play makes work really, really boring! Take time to occasionally have fun, team-building activities to not only provide a chance to build team rapport, but also to give employees something fun to look forward to, helping you not only improve your team’s ability to work together but also improving staff retention.

  5. Don’t be Stingy on the Praise – Giving out “Atta boys!” cost you absolutely nothing, but can mean a lot to your employees. Be sure to tell your employees when they’re doing a good job or have gone above and beyond, to let them know you appreciate them. Feeling appreciated builds organizational loyalty, which improves staff retention. Also, publicly recognize great employees to not only motivate them to continue to perform, but also encourage others to do the same.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

 CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

 Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

6 Tips To Build a Better Team

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013

Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.
~ Henry Ford

As Halford Luccock once said, “No one can whistle a symphony. It takes a whole orchestra to play it.” This analogy describes perfectly why teamwork is so critical. As individuals, we can accomplish tasks, but it takes a team to accomplish a vision. As critical as teams are to organizational success, it’s surprising to learn how many people do not understand how to put together an effective team. Following are six tips to building a better team.

  1. Screen Potential Teammates – Although you may have an idea of who should be on the team, don’t jump to conclusions. Instead, spend time screening potential teammates. Think beyond simple skill sets they’ll bring to the team and be sure to consider personality. Too many controlling personalities can bog down a team as surely as a team filled with only followers.

  2. Look for a Good Mix of Teammates – As mentioned above, you don’t want a team filled with one personality type. Also mix it up with experience levels and tenure at the organization. Placing new members of the organization on the team can help create solutions that go beyond the organization’s status quo.

  3. Don’t Stop Team Building – Even if you have a superstar team put together, don’t stop team building. Keep your eyes pealed for potential valuable additions to the team. There’s always room for improvement, and a new team member can not only bring fresh ideas but also encourage complacent team members to not rest on their laurels.

  4. Don’t Be Afraid to Make Cuts – Sometimes your initial ideas about what will make a good team just don’t work out. That’s OK! Don’t be afraid to pull some team members off the team and switch them with new members. Sometimes making a better team is a process of trial and error.

  5. Set Clearly Defined Goals – If you want to build a better team, you have to make sure they understand why they’re on the team. You can have the best team possible, but if they don’t know what exactly they’re supposed to be doing and by when, it’ll be impossible for them to work effectively and efficiently.

  6. Empower the Team – Give your team the power to make the decisions needed to complete their goals. If they have the responsibility to accomplish goals, they should be given the responsibility to handle the interim decisions to get to those goals. It’s the key to helping you build a better team.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

Leadership is much more an art, a belief, a condition of the heart, than a set of things to do. The visible signs of artful leadership are expressed, ultimately, in its practice.
~ Max Depree

“Leadership presence” – it’s one of those recent buzzphrases you hear tossed around lately. It sounds fairly straightforward, but what does it mean exactly? It’s one of those nebulous concepts people use and sometimes you wonder if they know really what is involved. In addition to learning what leadership presence is, more importantly, we talk about how to get this elusive quality.

Leadership Presence: What is It?

Although on the surface leadership presence is exactly what the name implies – the unique presence effective leaders have – it goes so much further than just that. Although it can be referred to as that certain je ne sais quoi a charismatic leader has, there are specific qualities that all leaders with true leadership presence personify. These qualities include:

  • Self confidence,

  • Genuineness and the ability to be candid,

  • The ability to convey a vision and garner support for this vision,

  • Active listener,

  • Effective speaking skills,

  • Openness to new ideas,

  • Motivational and inspirational,

  • Empowers others to succeed,

  • Risk taker, and

  • Actively works at branding themselves as an organizational leader.

Leadership Presence: How Do You Get It?

When you have all of the qualities listed above and, perhaps most importantly, actively use these to brand yourself as an organizational leader, you are on your way to developing leadership presence. Some of these qualities are items you can train to master. Others will require you to discover and uncover your innate abilities.

Becoming an active listener is a skill you can learn, as an example. There are lots of resources (including articles on this site!) to help you hone your listening skills. If you’re not an effective speaker, there are resources, seminars and organizations who can help you in this area too. Visit the “topics” section of my website, www.bouncebackhigher.com/topics, where I offer presentation skills training, as well as one-on-one speech coaching. In contrast to these learned skills, some will need you to simply consciously make an effort to express these qualities.

Being open to new ideas, for instance, may be difficult for you, if you’re used to being in charge and making most of the decisions for your organization. Risk taking may also be a challenge, if you’re naturally more conservative. However, in these instances, sometimes you may have to “fake it until you make it.” When others start to buy into your leadership presence, you’ll find qualities like “self confidence” that you have been pretending to have eventually come naturally.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.