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Archive for Team Building

Communication Leadership Skills

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

“The way we communicate with others and with ourselves ultimately determines the quality of our lives.”   ~Tony Robbins

During my seminars on Communication Leadership Skills, I am often told that communicating effectively with certain employees can be challenging. The manager’s message — even when given in a clear, concise and straightforward manner — can sometimes be misconstrued. Great managers and leaders need their message to be understood the first time. Achieving this type of clarity takes specific communication leadership skills that need to be developed and refined. While one style of communication will not fit everyone, these basic principles will provide a solid foundation for communication leadership skills that are needed to achieve ultimate success!

Listen Before You Communicate

Listening and communicating can perfectly complement each other if both skills are respected. Your message will be lost if all you do is talk at someone versus listening first to how they process information. If someone needs details in order to understand your message then share more information with them. If they are more of a bottom line type of person then edit yourself. If you are speaking to a large group then implement a medium tactic. Your employees will tend to listen more to you if you first listen to how they receive your information. By tailoring your approach you have a better chance of the information being retained versus misunderstood.

Show Empathy to Endear Your Listeners

Communication leadership skills cannot be effective without empathy. If you communicate your message that demonstrates you want to achieve understanding for a better workplace, your employees will appreciate your efforts. For example, if your employees are having a difficult time implementing a new process offer them your guidance and experience instead of mandates. While deadlines are important, you’ll have a better chance of meeting your goals if you empower your employees to find viable solutions. Communication leadership skills means taking the time to discuss the issues, finding the best solutions and working together toward successful results.

Take Out the Guesswork When You Communicate

Both managers and employees feel better when they know exactly what is being communicated. Having good communication leadership skills means you are saying precisely what you mean and it cannot be interpreted differently than the way you initially intended. This is achieved by giving clear work instructions when you delegate projects and not expecting your employees to read your mind. Realize that when you don’t include crucial information your vision can be compromised. Write out key points and give everyone the same information. That way you’ll have a quick reference in case a team member gets off track in the middle of your project.

Show Appreciation When Your Message is Heard

When employees really listen to the nuances of  your message that’s when you’ll know that your communication leadership skills have worked. Big ideas and key messages are easier to grasp, but the details can sometimes be lost, and the employees that pay attention to the entire message should be appreciated for their efforts. For example, if you tell your employees that you want to research a particular client and would like to know more about their recent mergers, some staff might see that as an opportunity to go beyond what is expected and give you a detailed report. When these occasions occur, make sure to point out this extra effort to the rest of the team by publicly thanking them. Not only will this encourage those employees to repeat their success, but also encourage others to strive for the same type of success as well.

Listening before you communicate, showing empathy, taking out communication guesswork and appreciating your employees who fully implement your message will always make your communication leadership skills shine!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

An internationally recognized award-winning speaker, Colleen Kettenhofen is the author of the book, Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You, as well as 10 unique audio programs available at www.BounceBackHigher.com

A Portland, Oregon-based motivational speaker, Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs before thousands in 48 states and six countries. She has served as a keynote speaker for conferences, corporate meetings, associations, Native-American tribes, and non-profits. Colleen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (971)212-0479.

What do bosses want from employees? Team players! In conducting in-depth conversations with hundreds of managers, supervisors and CEOs, this is part 2 in a series.

Part 1 talked about how managers repeatedly asked for “someone who is a proactive problem solver, not reactive–an employee who thinks ahead.” In part 2, we’ll explore the importance of getting along with others in the workplace. Let’s get started!

Be a team player willing to help your co-workers and customers. Admittedly, while conducting these in-depth conversations,  it was a surprise to me that “team player” was specifically mentioned over and over and ranked as the second top trait or behavior bosses want. Obviously, productivity is an important reason for this, but the effect that being a team player has on the morale of others scored even higher than productivity.

Bosses overwhelmingly mentioned “willing to help others, anyone” in terms of sharing job knowledge, skills, and ideas as well as “willingness to help customers.”

Simply put–and this is repeated throughout many of my articles, books, and blog posts–managers don’t want to be bothered with emotional conflicts among their employees. They frequently report, “I feel like a referee and a babysitter and I don’t want that role. I want my employees getting along and resolving conflict themselves.”

Bosses consider good employees to be those who attempt to resolve issues on their own first without always running to the person in charge. When I’m speaking, I often ask managers and CEOs in my audience, “Do any of you feel like you’re running an adult day care?” They laugh and say, “Yes! You must know some of my employees!”

Many managers and supervisors get promoted to management or leadership positions based on their hard skills or technical skills. They (and maybe you) received a promotion because they did a great job. But in these areas, the skills that got them promoted aren’t always the ones they need to manage people. That’s why they don’t want to deal with issues such as conflicts between employees. Not only that, these managers and CEOs are overloaded with work themselves and don’t have time to deal with emotional problems between co-workers.

So, what do bosses want from employees? Team players, proactive problem solvers and more. Stay tuned!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

An internationally recognized award-winning speaker, Colleen Kettenhofen is the author of the book, Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You, as well as 10 unique audio programs.

As a Portland, Oregon-based motivational speaker, Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs before thousands in 48 states and five countries. She has served as keynote speaker for conferences, corporate meetings, associations, Native-American tribes, and non-profits. Colleen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars. For more information, please visit http://www.BounceBackHigher.com

 

Many organizations provide leadership development programs for those with a managerial title. Yet salespeople, IT personnel, engineers and others yield great influence and can offer tremendous support to a company or association, especially during times of change. It’s important to recognize that the talents of these individuals can meet the criteria for effective leadership. Even if they don’t choose to aspire to a managerial path, they can benefit tremendously from leadership development programs and training. Anyone can improve their performance, productivity, and morale when they walk away with new tools for establishing greater trust, communication and credibility. Leadership development programs will help your people become better team players, more effective communicators, and proactive problem solvers. More than that, as they develop their interpersonal skills, they will be better equipped to reach their full potential and help the organization to do that as well!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

An internationally recognized award-winning speaker, Colleen is the author of the book Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You, as well as 10 unique audio programs available at www.BounceBackHigher.com

As a motivational speaker, Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining leadership development programs before thousands in 48 states and five countries. She has served as a keynote speaker for conferences, corporate meetings, associations, Native-American tribes, and non-profits. Colleen is available for speaking, coaching, and consulting by calling (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

10 Tips on Becoming a Good Manager

Friday, April 25th, 2014

Leaders must be close enough to relate to others, but far enough ahead to motivate them. ~John C. Maxwell

Good managers are not made overnight. It takes time and energy to develop all the skills that are needed to be successful. While some talents will come naturally, others need to be enhanced in order to become the leader that inspires success. Below are ten tips on becoming a good manager that will make this process an easier undertaking.

Managers are Driven by Integrity

Integrity is the key trait that reassures your employees of your character. An employee that regularly witnesses your trustworthy business practices will know they can trust you as well. Managers who are honest and authentic will be the most respected.

Inspiration and Communication is Their Recipe for Success

Leaders inspire their employees by communicating messages that encourage greatness. The tone and enthusiasm that you exude will become their inspiration for following the mission of the organization. Also, the more employees believe in your message the more they will share that vision with others.

Skillful Managers are Steadily Dependable

A great manager shows up on time. When needed, you are there, ready to roll up your sleeves to pitch in and help. No task is beneath your pay grade and employees will appreciate the fact that you will work with them instead of  just managing over them.

Consistency is Their Calling Card in Business

Are your employees on eggshells? Great managers are defined by a consistently strong work ethic and a stable atmosphere. You have a reputation for constantly improving your productivity by being consistent with policies, procedures, and moods. In my seminars on leadership, participants are always telling me they like a boss who is consistent with rules and emotions. Employees know you are committed to delivering the best results and you model how to achieve success every time.

Being Fair is One of Their Top Qualities

Favoritism is not acted upon by a smart manager. In fact, employees should not have the impression that you lean toward any one person more than someone else. Leaders understand that even a hint of bias will quickly breed resentment for those who are not the chosen ones.

Leaders Can See the Big Picture as They Look Forward

Knowing how both the small and large decisions of today influence the future is big picture thinking. Using your experience as a leader to see the potential pitfalls before they happen will also show your employees how you plan effective strategies successfully.

Great Managers Care About Everyone on Their Team

Leaders are not hesitant to show their employees that they care. When milestone events such as a birthday or work anniversary occur, they congratulate their employees enthusiastically. If the employee’s child breaks their arm you’d equally show concern. This will make the employee feel they are not just an anonymous worker and the big events in their life do matter.

Effective Leaders Have Your Back

When I ask managers and supervisors their biggest tips on becoming a good manager, they frequently say, “I like knowing my boss has my back.” Leaders are there to support their employees even when projects don’t always succeed. They don’t leave the employee hanging out on a limb to endure the entire brunt of disappointing results. As a great manager, you realize that being responsible for an employee means that their performance is also a reflection of your leadership.

Managers are Knowledgeable About Their Industry and Organization

Knowledge is the way a great manager succeeds both in their industry and at their organization. Knowing the latest trends and innovations that saves your organization time and money makes you a valuable asset. Being proactive will also make strategic planning easier and prevent fewer surprises down the road.

Leaders are Good Listeners Who Actively Hear You

Actively listening to employees is a key skill that managers need in order to be effective leaders. Restating the employee’s words will take time, patience and energy. However, when employees feel that you are truly listening to their concerns and viewpoints, they will be more willing to reciprocate when you are speaking to them. This will ultimately strengthen your business relationship.

Being a successful leader takes integrity, inspiring communication, dependability, consistency, fairness, forward thinking, caring, support, knowledge and active listening skills. Once you master these ten tips for becoming a good manager, you will find both happier employees and potential promotional opportunities in your future!

 

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS:Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran. she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

Managing Conflict in the Workplace

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. ~ Thomas Paine

One of the most frequent questions I get asked is, “What are some tips for managing conflict in the workplace?” This is because most managers want to know how to fend off major issues before they escalate. And even in the most congenial work environment, conflicts will occur. But this doesn’t have to create a sense of impending doom! When you effectively use the energy from conflicts in the workplace they also have the ability to transform your problems into opportunities. In fact, by incorporating the following steps your conflicts can become more manageable and take your problem solving methods to a whole new level.

Cool Heads Prevail During Times of Conflict in the Workplace

Conflicts get messy and complicated when they are steeped with emotion. Why? Both sides are passionate about their point of view and want to win! When someone is personally invested in winning they tend to lose sight of everything else. If things get too heated, this is when business relationships can be severely damaged. Bringing both sides together to discuss issues in a reasonable way will allow solutions to flourish. Additionally, separating the person from the issue will encourage discussion rather than arguments and debates.

When Managing Conflict in the Workplace, Encourage Proactive Problem Solving

When your employees start focusing on proactive solutions that’s when conflicts start to fade and problem solving thrives. Encourage and listen to all ideas and solutions. Create an environment that supports teamwork and discourages superficial criticism. If someone does drift back to their original position, ask them why other options couldn’t be considered. This gives each person a chance to carefully consider their proposals in an objective way.  When managing conflict in the workplace, the more reasonable you are in finding solutions, the better opportunity you will have in garnering a compromise.

Objectively Analyze the Situation

It’s easy to have lots of ideas but finding out how viable they are usually takes extensive research. Ask your employees to get more details about costs, timelines and contingency plans. This will also give them the ability to see if a particular process is possible while they are looking for the best solution. Encouraging your employees to fill in these details also fosters ownership of the process. As they gain perspective, some of their original objections will be resolved and lose their power in preventing progress.

Find Out What Works and Build From There

As employees go through the conflict resolution process they will discover that cooperation is the best path towards successful results. When they demonstrate good teamwork, tell them specifically what actions you appreciate. Giving this consistent and positive feedback will likely guide them into a mindset that thinks more about the team and less about their own interests. If they get off track a bit, then point out why the goal of resolving the issue is important to the organization.

As a motivational speaker, I see many employees who think they are a team when in fact they are just a work group. They haven’t been coached into a “we” mentality. One of the keys to successfully managing conflict in the workplace is steering them away from the “me” mindset.

Have a Definite Resolution

You might encounter a situation where multiple solutions are equally good. However, if they all can’t be implemented then a choice has to be made. Often, your leadership position gives you the advantage of knowing what upper management would support. Once the final choice is made, briefly explain your reasons to your employees and stick to your decision. When managing conflict in the workplace, consistency is key. Unresolved conflicts will keep things unsettled, you’ll appear passive, and nothing will move forward. Even if the final choice isn’t celebrated by everyone, at least it gives closure to the conflict and that will be appreciated by the majority.

Managing conflict in  the workplace isn’t easy, but with your assistance it can ultimately create a more cooperative, cohesive atmosphere for everyone!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows across the country and has written more than 40+ popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

From the overly confident to the overly negative, dealing with difficult personalities is a skill every team member should master.

“Strange is our situation here upon earth. Each of us comes for a short visit, not knowing why, yet sometimes seeming to divine a purpose. From the standpoint of daily life, however, there is one thing we do know: that man is here for the sake of other men.” ~ Albert Einstein

So, you’re on a team. Your team has a mission. The only problem is: your team has people in it. Not just ANY people, people with difficult personalities. You can throw your hands up and scream every time these difficult people rub you the wrong way, or you can learn productive ways of working with them without going insane.

Dealing with Difficult Personalities within a Team? Change Your Own Behavior

Let’s face it; people will not change just because you want them to. As any psychologist will tell you, the only way to change how you feel about a situation (or another person, for that matter) is to change your own behavior in coping. Here are a few examples of difficult personalities and simple ways of dealing with them when working within a team.

The Bully

The Bully is argumentative, aggressive and intimidating. To deal with The Bully, you will need to avoid arguing with him/her while maintaining control of each discussion. Sometimes, in order to maintain control without fueling The Bully’s flame, you will have to state your opinion clearly, succinctly, and directly and ignore their attempts at trapping you into an argument. In dealing with difficult personalities within a team, face the fact that you will not win in a debate with this person. No one will. It is easier not to incite workplace bullies. And workplace bullying is at an all-time high. How do I know? It’s the topic I’m most frequently asked to speak on when I’m a guest on a radio show.

Negative Nelly

Negative Nelly sees the unfavorable in every situation. To them, every idea is bad and every attempt at a solution to a problem will result in a negative outcome. Negative Nelly thrives on when he/she can say the following words: I TOLD YOU SO, or, THAT WON’T WORK. No one likes to hear those words. The best way to deal with this difficult person is to avoid discussing solutions with them. When these situations cannot be avoided, try to remain positive and realistic. Assume Negative Nelly will bring the “I told you so’s” along to every discussion and be prepared not to let them get to you. When I conduct leadership seminars and keynotes for corporations and associations, bosses tell me that one of their biggest frustrations is negativity. It’s easy to see why. If it’s not dealt with, it can become like a cancer that spreads!

The Over Achiever or Know-It-All

The Over Achiever seems to know everything. This “Know-It-All” person can spew out “facts” on any given subject. They are similar to the workplace bullies. The Over Achiever likes to stand in the spotlight and wants everyone to “know” how smart he/she is. Many times, it’s just easier not to get wrapped up in conversation with this person to avoid all the know-it-all-ness about them! But, it can be more productive to admit to yourself  (and to them) that they may actually be a great source of knowledge. Ask a few questions and throw in some praise now and then–sincere praise, of course! you may see that their need to “show off” might dissipate a bit once they realize that others appreciate their knowledge base.

The Non-Team Player

The person within the team who is obviously NOT a team player will be the most difficult personality to deal with. The Non-Team Player is the most destructive person on the team. Again, these people are similar to workplace bullies but in a different, “silent” antagonistic fashion. This person does not share knowledge and does not participate well in open discussions. They always seem to be “doing things” behind everyone’s backs”. Everyone questions the motives of this person. The most effective way of dealing with The Non-Team Player is by kindly questioning them in group discussions. Don’t take “I don’t know” for an answer. Force them to participate by including them as much as possible in all team activities.

Dealing with difficult personalities seems to increase exponentially in difficulty when working within a team. It is important to keep in mind that you are all on the same team working towards the same goal. And most importantly, you all NEED each other. Each individual team member’s skill sets and strengths were sought out for a reason: to complete a team. Learn to appreciate what each person has to offer and to work effectively with those who tend to make things a little difficult at times. It may not be easy at first, but in dealing with difficult personalities within a team, it will certainly help in securing your sanity!

It’s like the old cliche’ goes: It takes all kinds of personalities to make the world go ’round!

It is in how YOU deal with them that defines who YOU are (and how you feel)!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, and Motivational Speaker

Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 dynamic and entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

A Portland, Oregon-based motivational speaker, Colleen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

 

 

Improving Staff Retention

Thursday, June 27th, 2013


There are two things people want more than sex and money… recognition and praise.
~
Mary Kay Ash

Hiring great people is a critical part of ensuring your organization’s success. However, if you’re unable to retain those amazing employees, they’ll do your company little good. In fact, losing good staff not only costs your organization time and money, when trying to fill those open positions, but high employee turnover will also damage your team’s morale! Following are five tips to help you improve your staff retention.

  1. Be Competitive – This should go without saying, paying your employees competitively is critical to improving staff retention. Sometimes long-time employees’ compensation falls out of line with the going market rate, especially if your company has withheld raises in recent years, due to the challenging economy. When this happens, don’t be surprised if your best people are recruited out from under your nose.

  2. Little Things Mean A Lot – In addition to competitive compensation, don’t forget about the importance of other small perks. Providing doughnuts on Mondays, free gym memberships or the ability to partially telecommute cost very little, in the grand scheme of things, but can mean a lot when you’re talking about improving staff retention.

  3. Promote from Within – Many of your best employees have career goals they want to achieve. Help them achieve these goals and keep them loyal to your company, When your employees feel they’re in a dead-end position, that’s when they’ll start looking for employment elsewhere.

  4. Have Fun – All work and no play makes work really, really boring! Take time to occasionally have fun, team-building activities to not only provide a chance to build team rapport, but also to give employees something fun to look forward to, helping you not only improve your team’s ability to work together but also improving staff retention.

  5. Don’t be Stingy on the Praise – Giving out “Atta boys!” cost you absolutely nothing, but can mean a lot to your employees. Be sure to tell your employees when they’re doing a good job or have gone above and beyond, to let them know you appreciate them. Feeling appreciated builds organizational loyalty, which improves staff retention. Also, publicly recognize great employees to not only motivate them to continue to perform, but also encourage others to do the same.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

 CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

 Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

6 Tips To Build a Better Team

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013

Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.
~ Henry Ford

As Halford Luccock once said, “No one can whistle a symphony. It takes a whole orchestra to play it.” This analogy describes perfectly why teamwork is so critical. As individuals, we can accomplish tasks, but it takes a team to accomplish a vision. As critical as teams are to organizational success, it’s surprising to learn how many people do not understand how to put together an effective team. Following are six tips to building a better team.

  1. Screen Potential Teammates – Although you may have an idea of who should be on the team, don’t jump to conclusions. Instead, spend time screening potential teammates. Think beyond simple skill sets they’ll bring to the team and be sure to consider personality. Too many controlling personalities can bog down a team as surely as a team filled with only followers.

  2. Look for a Good Mix of Teammates – As mentioned above, you don’t want a team filled with one personality type. Also mix it up with experience levels and tenure at the organization. Placing new members of the organization on the team can help create solutions that go beyond the organization’s status quo.

  3. Don’t Stop Team Building – Even if you have a superstar team put together, don’t stop team building. Keep your eyes pealed for potential valuable additions to the team. There’s always room for improvement, and a new team member can not only bring fresh ideas but also encourage complacent team members to not rest on their laurels.

  4. Don’t Be Afraid to Make Cuts – Sometimes your initial ideas about what will make a good team just don’t work out. That’s OK! Don’t be afraid to pull some team members off the team and switch them with new members. Sometimes making a better team is a process of trial and error.

  5. Set Clearly Defined Goals – If you want to build a better team, you have to make sure they understand why they’re on the team. You can have the best team possible, but if they don’t know what exactly they’re supposed to be doing and by when, it’ll be impossible for them to work effectively and efficiently.

  6. Empower the Team – Give your team the power to make the decisions needed to complete their goals. If they have the responsibility to accomplish goals, they should be given the responsibility to handle the interim decisions to get to those goals. It’s the key to helping you build a better team.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

Colleen’s Quick Sales Tip for Today

Thursday, December 11th, 2008

Look at each customer as a person. Explain how your
product or service adds value to them based on what they
want. Have the attitude that you are helping people get
what they want. If you truly believe what you are selling
will help them (and you should!) explain how it will make
them feel. In other words, how are you making their
life easier? How are you adding value? As a salesperson,
you are first and foremost a problem solver.

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Tune Up Your Team! 6 Reasons Teams Fail

Tuesday, July 1st, 2008

One of the main reasons why teams fail is because the people on the team don’t like each other. All it takes is a personality conflict, and if the team hasn’t been trained in conflict resolution, it can impact everyone. I frequently ask my audiences, most of whom consist of managers, supervisors and team leaders, what they see as the main reasons why teams fail. Here are some of the most common reasons teams are not more productive:

  1. Backstabbing. If you are the team lead and backstabbing is an issue, suggest the team come up with a rule. For example, if there is backstabbing among team members and they can’t resolve it on their own, it goes before the team leader.

  2. Interrupting in meetings. Ask the team to come up with a rule such as, “No one is allowed to speak until the other person finishes and you raise your hand.”

  3. Tangents. If someone is going off on a tangent in the meeting, tactfully ask the rest of the group if they want to hear more about the issue. If not, let that person know they can talk with you after the meeting.

  4. Not sharing job knowledge. This is so important it should be in everyone’s job description.

  5. Excessive personal use of the internet or telephone. Someone is sending too many joke emails or talking loudly while on a personal phone call.

  6. Talking loudly in a cubicle-ridden environment or listening to messages while on speaker phone. Have everyone set the ground rules for what is considered loud and disruptive. .

There are many more reasons why teams fail to be more productive. Such as someone pretending to work at their cubicle, but underneath their desk they’re text messaging! Communication is key to the success of any team. Gather your team together for a meeting. Have everyone discuss any potentially unacceptable behaviors affecting team morale. Write everything down. Print it out and give everyone a copy. There will be more “buy in” because they were involved in the solutions.

Do you want your team to communicate more effectively and exhibit greater productivity? Please read my full article, “When Teams Don’t Work: 10 Reasons Teams Fail,” at www.ColleenSpeaks.com/teams_do_not.htm “Sow an act, reap a habit; sow a habit, reap a character; sow a character, reap a destiny.”
– G.D. Boardman

Visit Colleen Kettenhofen’s website at: www.colleenspeaks.com

Watch Colleen’s live speaking engagements:www.ColleenSpeaks.com/kettenhofen_video.htm

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