To schedule Colleen, please call:
(971) 212-0479
in Portland, Oregon

Archive for Colleen Kettenhofen

Communication Leadership Skills

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

“The way we communicate with others and with ourselves ultimately determines the quality of our lives.”   ~Tony Robbins

During my seminars on Communication Leadership Skills, I am often told that communicating effectively with certain employees can be challenging. The manager’s message — even when given in a clear, concise and straightforward manner — can sometimes be misconstrued. Great managers and leaders need their message to be understood the first time. Achieving this type of clarity takes specific communication leadership skills that need to be developed and refined. While one style of communication will not fit everyone, these basic principles will provide a solid foundation for communication leadership skills that are needed to achieve ultimate success!

Listen Before You Communicate

Listening and communicating can perfectly complement each other if both skills are respected. Your message will be lost if all you do is talk at someone versus listening first to how they process information. If someone needs details in order to understand your message then share more information with them. If they are more of a bottom line type of person then edit yourself. If you are speaking to a large group then implement a medium tactic. Your employees will tend to listen more to you if you first listen to how they receive your information. By tailoring your approach you have a better chance of the information being retained versus misunderstood.

Show Empathy to Endear Your Listeners

Communication leadership skills cannot be effective without empathy. If you communicate your message that demonstrates you want to achieve understanding for a better workplace, your employees will appreciate your efforts. For example, if your employees are having a difficult time implementing a new process offer them your guidance and experience instead of mandates. While deadlines are important, you’ll have a better chance of meeting your goals if you empower your employees to find viable solutions. Communication leadership skills means taking the time to discuss the issues, finding the best solutions and working together toward successful results.

Take Out the Guesswork When You Communicate

Both managers and employees feel better when they know exactly what is being communicated. Having good communication leadership skills means you are saying precisely what you mean and it cannot be interpreted differently than the way you initially intended. This is achieved by giving clear work instructions when you delegate projects and not expecting your employees to read your mind. Realize that when you don’t include crucial information your vision can be compromised. Write out key points and give everyone the same information. That way you’ll have a quick reference in case a team member gets off track in the middle of your project.

Show Appreciation When Your Message is Heard

When employees really listen to the nuances of  your message that’s when you’ll know that your communication leadership skills have worked. Big ideas and key messages are easier to grasp, but the details can sometimes be lost, and the employees that pay attention to the entire message should be appreciated for their efforts. For example, if you tell your employees that you want to research a particular client and would like to know more about their recent mergers, some staff might see that as an opportunity to go beyond what is expected and give you a detailed report. When these occasions occur, make sure to point out this extra effort to the rest of the team by publicly thanking them. Not only will this encourage those employees to repeat their success, but also encourage others to strive for the same type of success as well.

Listening before you communicate, showing empathy, taking out communication guesswork and appreciating your employees who fully implement your message will always make your communication leadership skills shine!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

An internationally recognized award-winning speaker, Colleen Kettenhofen is the author of the book, Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You, as well as 10 unique audio programs available at www.BounceBackHigher.com

A Portland, Oregon-based motivational speaker, Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs before thousands in 48 states and six countries. She has served as a keynote speaker for conferences, corporate meetings, associations, Native-American tribes, and non-profits. Colleen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (971)212-0479.

What Do Bosses Want? Begin Work on Time

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Yesterday, I conducted a leadership seminar in Salem, Oregon, and the subject of “what do bosses want” came up. Not surprisingly, showing up on time was at the top of the list. Certainly, this depends on what type of job you perform. For example, salespeople and managers are frequently out in the field. Yet, for the person expected to report for work at a specific time, it can affect the morale of everyone if they’re late.

Let’s say that you have an upcoming meeting. Showing up on time needs to be your number one priority if you want to be considered a good employee–even if you’re in sales, work from home, and go out on sales calls. Based on my in-depth conversations with managers, supervisors, human resources personnel, and others in leadership positions over the years, attendance ranks number one when bosses consider whether an employee is a good worker. Many young workers right out of school think they should be judged by the work they do, not by what time they show up for work and leave at the end of the day. However, most managers consider attendance and punctuality to be major success factors.

Attendance also tops the list of criteria when bosses have to fire one employee or another. Included in this first ranking is a factor you might not realize. Do you actually start working on time? Believe me, your boss as well as co-workers notice if you walk in, go to the bathroom or break room, make coffee, chat up a storm, and then finally start working much later. Even if you’re productive, a lot of supervisors worry about starting your work late because of how it affects the morale of others. Some bosses believe if they make allowances for you in this area, they’ll have to make allowances for others. And they don’t want to do that.

What do bosses want? Make sure you show up on time. Like it or not, others are watching you!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and leadership expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs in 48 states and six countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and the book SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

A Portland, Oregon-based motivational speaker, Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (971)212-0479, or visiting www.BounceBackHigher.com

What Employers Look for on Interviews

Friday, June 6th, 2014

Later today, I’m going to be a guest on a radio show being interviewed by Doug McDuff on AM 1380 in Southern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois. The topic? What employers look for on interviews.

In these tough economic times, it’s especially important to learn what  interviewers look for that will make them hire you. For example, they want to see if you’ve conducted any research. Have you checked out their companies’ websites even if they’re well known? When I was conducting research for my book, Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You, a number of managers reported how impressed they were that some applicants brought printouts from the company website and asked questions based on what they’d read. This is notable because employers want a sense that you specifically want to work for their organization–not just any job will do.

After Doug’s radio show, I’ll post more information about what employers look for on interviews. Stay tuned!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

An internationally recognized award-winning speaker, Colleen is the author of the book, Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You, as well as 10 unique audio programs available at www.BounceBackHigher.com

As a motivational speaker and leadership expert, Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs before thousands in 48 states and six countries. She has served as a keynote speaker for conferences, corporate meetings, associations, Native-American tribes, and non-profits. Based in Portland, Oregon, Colleen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (971)212-0479.

 

 

What do bosses want from employees? Team players! In conducting in-depth conversations with hundreds of managers, supervisors and CEOs, this is part 2 in a series.

Part 1 talked about how managers repeatedly asked for “someone who is a proactive problem solver, not reactive–an employee who thinks ahead.” In part 2, we’ll explore the importance of getting along with others in the workplace. Let’s get started!

Be a team player willing to help your co-workers and customers. Admittedly, while conducting these in-depth conversations,  it was a surprise to me that “team player” was specifically mentioned over and over and ranked as the second top trait or behavior bosses want. Obviously, productivity is an important reason for this, but the effect that being a team player has on the morale of others scored even higher than productivity.

Bosses overwhelmingly mentioned “willing to help others, anyone” in terms of sharing job knowledge, skills, and ideas as well as “willingness to help customers.”

Simply put–and this is repeated throughout many of my articles, books, and blog posts–managers don’t want to be bothered with emotional conflicts among their employees. They frequently report, “I feel like a referee and a babysitter and I don’t want that role. I want my employees getting along and resolving conflict themselves.”

Bosses consider good employees to be those who attempt to resolve issues on their own first without always running to the person in charge. When I’m speaking, I often ask managers and CEOs in my audience, “Do any of you feel like you’re running an adult day care?” They laugh and say, “Yes! You must know some of my employees!”

Many managers and supervisors get promoted to management or leadership positions based on their hard skills or technical skills. They (and maybe you) received a promotion because they did a great job. But in these areas, the skills that got them promoted aren’t always the ones they need to manage people. That’s why they don’t want to deal with issues such as conflicts between employees. Not only that, these managers and CEOs are overloaded with work themselves and don’t have time to deal with emotional problems between co-workers.

So, what do bosses want from employees? Team players, proactive problem solvers and more. Stay tuned!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

An internationally recognized award-winning speaker, Colleen Kettenhofen is the author of the book, Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You, as well as 10 unique audio programs.

As a Portland, Oregon-based motivational speaker, Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs before thousands in 48 states and five countries. She has served as keynote speaker for conferences, corporate meetings, associations, Native-American tribes, and non-profits. Colleen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars. For more information, please visit http://www.BounceBackHigher.com

 

What Bosses Want from Employees

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

In the coming days and weeks, I’m going to be sharing the top traits, qualities and characteristics that bosses want from employees and vice versa. This is based on hundreds of interviews that I conducted with managers, supervisors and CEOs for my book Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You.

Some of the things bosses want from employees will seem like common sense. Then again, as you know, common sense isn’t always commonly applied!

What Bosses Want from Employees

What’s big on their list? Be proactive and solutions-oriented; go above and beyond. When managers, supervisors and CEOs were asked to describe the traits and behaviors necessary for a subordinate to be considered a good employee, overwhelmingly I heard, “Someone who goes above and beyond.” That’s worth repeating: In today’s economy, for you to be considered a “good” employee, bosses expect you to go “above and beyond.” So, if necessary, work longer hours and put in extra effort. If you don’t, someone else will.

Also managers repeatedly asked for “someone proactive, not reactive–an employee who thinks ahead. If that employee experiences problems, he or she looks for solutions.” So to be an exemplary employee, condition yourself to be solution-focused rather than problem-focused.

What bosses want from employees may seem like a lot. In my leadership seminars and keynotes, I always tell managers and supervisors it starts at the top. Be an effective role model. Be the change you want to see.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

An internationally recognized award-winning speaker, Colleen Kettenhofen is the author of the book, Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You, as well as 10 unique audio programs.

As a Portland, Oregon-based motivational speaker, Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs before thousands in 48 states and five countries. She has served as keynote speaker for conferences, corporate meetings, associations, Native-American tribes, and non-profits. Colleen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars. For more information, please visit www.BounceBackHigher.com

 

You don’t lead by hitting people over the head–that’s assault, not leadership. ~Dwight Eisenhower

The first day a new employee arrives at your office is often mixed with excitement and uncertainty. And you both want the same result — success. But this will only happen if you use your effective leadership skills to initiate the groundwork for developing their unique talents. Starting out on the right foot will give your employee the blueprint they need to be a top contributor and you the reassurance they are following the right path.

Here are five of the most effective ways to start achieving success beginning with their first day:

Make Your Expectations Clear and Detailed

Nothing will make your employee happier than knowing where you stand. Remember, they are working at your company to help you! But in order to achieve your goals they need to know what success looks like in your eyes. During that first meeting be clear about their role in the company, what you are trying to achieve and when it all needs to be accomplished. Don’t be vague. Set clear standards from the beginning and give your employee specific examples they can follow. It will take time to put in this extra effort but you’ll be laying a solid foundation to get the results you really want. In my leadership seminars, one of the most common takeaways is managers realizing they need to set more quantifiable standards for their employees.

Provide a Way to Give and Receive Feedback

Feedback is crucial to ensure the quality of the work you receive. As you are working with your new hire tell them what works well and how they can improve. As the boss, you have the advantage of knowing when something hasn’t worked before and how to quickly resolve those issues. Also, when your employee has questions or concerns tell them how to approach you. Do you have an open door policy? Or do you prefer getting all of their questions in a single email. Determine what process works best for you and clearly communicate your preferences so they can be implemented. It’s one of the secrets to practicing effective leadership.

Managing Conflict in the Workplace

Conflicts come with every project and how you handle it will determine how smoothly things are resolved. Encourage your employees to solve smaller conflicts on their own and be supportive when they need additional leadership from you. When managing conflict in the workplace, actively listen to their concerns and urge their input for a resolution to the situation. If other people are providing the conflict, arrange for a group meeting to discuss the various issues and find common ground. Most importantly, show your employee they have your full support for resolving difficult situations and also troubleshooting any future issues. It’s one of the keys to successfully managing conflict in the workplace.

How to Appreciate and Encourage Employees

Effective leadership means not only pointing out the problems but also the successes. A thoughtful thank you goes a long way to show that you appreciate your employee’s efforts. Being specific about what you liked about their work will inspire the same results later. Additionally, acknowledge when they overcome difficult situations so they can see that you empathize with their struggles. Any opportunity you have to publicly acknowledge their success or give them a special award will also encourage others on your team to achieve similar results. Over time give employees the opportunity to lead and encourage others by becoming a group leader on future projects.

Motivating and Inspiring Employees Toward Top Results

Every employee has a special skill or ability they enjoy doing. It is usually some task they would like to do even if they weren’t  getting paid! It takes effective leadership skills to determine what these abilities are and to assign them to the right person. If you have the choice to give an accounting task to someone who likes doing math problems in their spare time, why not encourage them to crunch some numbers for you? Maybe they would like to get their degree and pursue this type of work in the future. Finding the balance between what is beneficial for your company and the future aspirations of your employee will help both of you achieve success.

Engaging these strategies will help assure the first day with your new employee will be one of many that encourage a solid working relationship that can build and develop in the future!

 

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows across the country and has written more than 40+ articles on diverse workplace issues. She has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries.

She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen can assist your organization with successful leadership development through her keynotes, seminars, and workshops. Be sure to visit www.BounceBackHigher.com for details or call (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

 

 

 

7 Common Leadership Mistakes

Friday, February 15th, 2013

“Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.”

~ Albert Einstein

You’ve heard the saying – Everyone makes mistakes. Mistakes are a natural part of the learning process. However, not all mistakes are inevitable. Leaders who learn from the mistakes of others, are one step ahead of the game! Following are seven common leadership mistakes you can avoid.

  1. Being the anti-micromanger – Although micromanaging your employees can be completely counterproductive, going to the other extreme is a mistake many leaders make. Finding the balance between “hands off” leadership and micromanagement is difficult. Make sure your employees not only have direction, but also the support they need from you through the entire project or task.

  2. Lack of goal definition – Failure to clearly define goals is another common leadership mistake. Without clearly defined goals, your employees won’t know exactly what tasks they need to accomplish. With the increasing demands on employees to take on more responsibilities, this means your employees likely have a very full plate. Without specific goals, they may find it hard to prioritize and work efficiently and effectively.

  3. Providing little to no positive feedback – When your employees aren’t doing well, you let them know the areas where they need to improve, right? It’s just as important to let them know when they’re doing things right as well! Failing to compliment employees is a common leadership mistake you can easily avoid. Take time to acknowledge your employee’s hard work, not only when they go above-and-beyond, but when they do their everyday tasks as well. It’ll let them know you appreciate them and help keep them motivated.

  4. Failing to understand what motivates your employees – We may believe money makes the world go ’round, but thinking this is the end all and be all of motivating factors for your employees is a big leadership mistake! Although fairly and adequately compensating your employees is critical, there are other items that are higher up on their scale of needs. Work-life balance, career opportunities, and self-actualization are just some of the factors your employees likely value more than money.

  5. Being a friend, not a boss – This is a tricky balancing act that often leads to a common leadership mistake of being “too friendly” with your employees. Although you want to be approachable for your employees and socializing can help you form tighter bonds with your staff, you have to draw the line with your relationships. In the end, both of you need to understand that you are their boss, first and foremost, and this will mean sometimes you will have to make decisions they may not like.

  6. Succumbing to “warm body syndrome” – You have an open position you really need to fill. Candidates are applying, but they’re not exactly what you’re looking for. As the days pass, you become more desperate, and you get to the point where you feel like almost any warm body in a position is better than nothing. That’s warm body syndrome. However, this common leadership mistake has repercussions beyond simply the position you’re hiring for. A bad hire can negatively affect productivity in that position as well as the other employees who interact and rely on that position. Additionally, a bad hire can damage morale of other employees.

  7. Forgetting your a leader, not just a manager – As Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper once said, “You manage things; you lead people.” Failure to lead and relying on management is a leadership mistake you can’t afford to make. Sharing your organization’s vision, aligning your employees’ personal goals with this vision, and inspiring them to work together as a team toward both the organization’s and their personal goals, are all necessary components of leadership.

 

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

 Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

7 Tips to Becoming an Effective Mentor

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”

~Benjamin Franklin

 There are numerous benefits to mentoring for your organization. Mentoring gives junior employees critical feedback and support, it passes knowledge down the organizational chart and it helps identify superstar employees. However, not all managers are equipped to be great mentors. Follow the seven tips below and you can become an effective mentor!

  1. Get to know your mentoree – An effective mentoring relationship centers on trust. To begin to build trust, get to know your mentoree. Determine what skills your mentoree has, what areas he needs improvement in, as well as what goals he has and what motivates him. This relationship needs to be about him, not about you.
  2. Become an advocate – An effective mentor advocates for their mentoree. Your role in this relationship isn’t to simply “train the new guy” but rather to help him develop the skills and experience that will advance his career.
  3. Offer both guidance and counseling – If you want to be an effective mentor, you have to go beyond being a teacher. In an effective mentoring relationship, the mentor becomes a personal advisor and sounding board, as well as guide warning the mentoree about potential organizational or situational hazards and pitfalls before they occur.
  4. Be a role model – The phrase, “Do as I say, not as I do” doesn’t fly in an effective mentoring relationship. Effective mentors model the behaviors and attitudes their mentorees will need to succeed within the organization.
  5. Start off on a positive note – It’s important to start your mentoring relationship with a positive experience. For this reason, an effective mentor will select a first project that the mentoree is most likely to complete successfully. Select something too difficult, and you’ll discourage your mentoree.
  6. Inspire and motivate your mentoree – Keeping your mentoree inspired and motivated is critical to an effective mentoring relationship. Effective mentors build links between the mentoree’s personal goals and desires and the organization’s goals. This builds ownership in the organization’s mission and keeps the mentoree dedicated, even when times are challenging.
  7. Be willing to learn from your mentoree – Lastly, an effective mentor knows this relationship isn’t a one-way street. You can learn from your mentoree too! Although the mentoree may not have as much experience as you, he may have more current theoretical knowledge. Plus, this “freshness” allows the mentoree to consider a situation without bias and allows him to create solutions you may not have considered.

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

 

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

Thanksgiving Gratitude, Become More Peaceful

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

 Thanksgiving Gratitude, Become More Peaceful   

     In conducting research for my book, “Secrets Your Boss Isn’t Telling You,” many managers and supervisors mentioned the importance of living a balanced life, believing in yourself, and acting with integrity. As a result, chapter 13 is titled “Excellence in Action–6 Principles for Practicing Authenticity, Integrity, and Belief in Yourself.”

     One of the tips I share in that section is to be more contemplative. Spend time just “being.” And make a habit of being grateful. This certainly applies to Thanksgiving gratitude. For example, try getting up a little earlier in the morning, and spend at least 10 minutes in prayer, meditation, or silence. Read inspirational or motivational literature. As you focus on being more peaceful, you’ll become more peaceful. Try an experiment: first thing out of bed, get on your knees and be grateful. Then, write down five things you are thankful for that day. I do this almost every morning of my life. I am thankful for the beauty of the day.

     Gratitude reveals the good in lessons from our past, helps us live for today, and creates positive expectancy for tomorrow. Practice being grateful and you’ll become grateful.

“If you concentrate on finding whatever is good in every situation, you will discover that your life will suddenly be filled with gratitude, a feeling that nurtures the soul.” ~ Harold Kushner 

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen has interviewed more than 200 managers and a handful of top executives and CEOs. She is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

 

 

    

Dog Rescue Poem

Friday, January 29th, 2010

Animals bring so much joy to our lives. My own 49 pound rescue dog just happens to be named Joy and since I adopted her she has brought me just that! She doesn’t know that the reason I was so distracted today is because I’m working on a book about Joy, literally and figuratively, and how to be happy in spite of your circumstances. For all you animal lovers, here’s a great poem about rescuing dogs and the joy we can bring them:

    Dog Rescue Poem

Once I was a lonely dog,
Just looking for a home.
I had no place to go,
No one to call my own.
I wandered up and down the streets,
in rain in heat and snow.
I ate whatever I could find,
I was always on the go.
My skin would itch, my feet were sore,
My body ached with pain.
And no one stopped to give a pat
Or gently say my name.
I never saw a loving glance,
I was always on the run.
For people thought that hurting me
was really lots of fun.
And then one day I heard a voice
So gentle, kind and sweet,
And arms so soft reached down to me
And took me off my feet.
“No one again will hurt you”
Was whispered in my ear.
“You’ll have a home to call your own
where you will know no fear”
“You will be dry, you will be warm,
you’ll have enough to eat”
“And rest assured that when you sleep,
your dreams will all be sweet”.
I was afraid I must admit,
I’ve lived so long in fear.
I can’t remember when I let
A human come so near.
And as she tended to my wounds
And bathed and brushed my fur
She told me ’bout the rescue group
And what it meant to her.
She said, “We are a circle,
A line that never ends”.
“And in the center there is you
protected by new friends”.

“And all around you are
the ones that check the pounds,
And those that share their home
after you’ve been found”.
“And all the other folk
are searching near and far”.
“To find the perfect home for you,
where you can be a star”.
She said, “There is a family,
that’s waiting patiently,
and pretty soon we’ll find them,
just you wait and see”.
“And then they’ll join our circle
they’ll help to make it grow,
so there’ll be room for more like you,
who have no place to go”.
I waited very patiently,
The days they came and went.
Today’s the day I thought,
my family will be sent.
Then just when I began to think
It wasn’t meant to be,
there were people standing there
just gazing down at me.
I knew them in a heart beat,
I could tell they felt it too.
They said, “We have been waiting
for a special dog like you”.
Now every night I say a prayer
to all the Gods that be.
“Thank you for the life I live
and all you’ve given me”.
“But most of all protect the dogs
in the pound and on the street”.
“And send a Rescue Person
to lift them off their feet”.

www.ColleenSpeaks.com