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Archive for management

The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.
~Thomas Paine

Employee conflict is inevitable. Put a group of people together and it’s not uncommon for the myriad of personalities to clash from time-to-time. Your main priority when this happens is to manage the employee disagreement without escalating the situation.

Monitoring Employee Disagreements:

Your first duty to managing employee disagreements is to monitor the situation. Even if the dispute seems petty, be aware of what is going on. Keep your eyes and ears on the situation. The employees involved may be able to come to a resolution on their own. In fact, it’s often better if they can come to an understanding on their own; however, if it begins to negatively impact their performance or if there’s a danger the situation may escalate, you’ll want to quickly step in.

Mediation in Employee Disagreements:

If the employee disagreement lingers or escalates, it’s time for you to step in. However, at this point, it’s not your job to make a decision for them. As a mediator, set up a neutral location for the parties involved to discuss the dispute. Set ground rules (such as taking turns speaking) and help everyone involved express their side of the disagreement to one another. Give each party equal time to speak. Let them brainstorm ideas for resolution – something that creates a compromise amongst the parties.

Resolution of Employee Disagreements:

Sometimes an employee disagreement simply can’t come to a resolution by the employees on their own, even with the help of a mediator. This is where you, as the manager, must step in. It is your duty to protect the best interests of your organization, and to come up with a solution to the conflict that is the best strategically for your company. If possible, try to come up with a win-win situation for everyone. This may not be possible though, and it may mean one party is more satisfied with the resolution than the other, or it may mean both parties are unhappy. However, present the solution based on facts and why it’s in the best interest of the organization, and therefore in the best interest of all employees.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Confidence

Friday, August 2nd, 2013

Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.
~ Helen Keller

Although there are those who cross the line from confident into overconfident, many of us still have some challenges with self-confidence, at least at some point in time in our careers. Even if we’re secure in our positions, things can happen that make us doubt ourselves and our abilities. Following our five ways to strengthen your confidence.

  1. Take Stock in Yourself – When self-doubt begins to creep in, honestly take stock in yourself, your experience and your abilities. You’re in the position you’re in because of your hard work and your talents. It’s not a fluke. When new challenges arise that you worry you can’t handle, think back to the other challenges in your past that you’ve overcome. Remind yourself of the times in the past that seemed insurmountable, but you persevered!

  2. Believe in Yourself, Even When You Don’t – There is an old saying – “Fake it until you make it.” When you find your confidence slipping, fake it. Act with confidence, even when you’re not feeling overly confident. Before you know it, the “confidence act” will be reality.

  3. Mitigate Your Weaknesses – No matter how amazing you are, everyone has weaknesses. Its these weaknesses that usually are the biggest source of our insecurities. Acknowledge what areas you’re not as strong in and find ways to address them. This can include delegating tasks to employees who excel in the areas you’re not as strong in, or getting training or education in areas you’d like to be stronger. Both of these can turn your weaknesses into strengths.

  4. Bounce Back When Mistakes Happen – No one is perfect. No one. At some point, we all make mistakes. Don’t let this eat away your self-confidence when mistakes happen. Instead, find out where you went wrong then take steps to not make the same mistake ever again.

  5. Remember to Be Thankful – When insecurity makes you worry if you’re good enough, take a moment to be thankful. Acknowledge and appreciate all of skills and talents you do have. Focusing on the positive and not the negative can help you feel more secure.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

Moving from Buddy to Boss

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

Leaders must be close enough to relate to others, but far enough ahead to motivate them.”
~ John C. Maxwell

Friendships with your employees – when, if ever, is it appropriate? This is one of the most difficult questions for managers to answer. From an academic HR standpoint, the answer is often cut and dry – It’s never appropriate. However, in the real world, it’s often not that simple.

Relationships between between simply can’t be governed by corporate policy. Managers are not unfeeling robots. It’s only natural, after spending time, day in and day out, with people that there are going to be some people you like. In fact, to move from manager to a true leader, you need to be supportive and caring with your employees. However, does this mean it’s OK to be both buddy and boss?

In a word – no.

Although you do want to develop a trusting relationship based on mutual respect, between yourself and your employees, there still needs to be well-defined boundaries. You may be “friendly.” but you are, in the end, their boss, first and foremost. Here are four reasons why you have to move away from “buddy” if you’re the boss.

  1. Even if your actions and treatment of a person are completely unbiased, if they are your friend, others will perceive anything favorable as favoritism.

  2. Even when you’re trying to be unbiased in the treatment of your employees, you may subconsciously treat those who are your friends more favorably. It’s a natural tendency to treat people we have a personal relationship better than those we don’t.

  3. It is difficult to fully fulfill the duties of manager, when the employee in question is a friend. This includes – honest reviews, disciplinary actions, even firing the friend.

  4. You open up your company to potential lawsuits. Each time your friend receives favorable treatment (raise, promotion, etc.), even if it’s well-deserved, you risk a discrimination lawsuit from the other employees. Even if your company wins the suit, the process is often costly.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

6 Tips To Build a Better Team

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013

Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.
~ Henry Ford

As Halford Luccock once said, “No one can whistle a symphony. It takes a whole orchestra to play it.” This analogy describes perfectly why teamwork is so critical. As individuals, we can accomplish tasks, but it takes a team to accomplish a vision. As critical as teams are to organizational success, it’s surprising to learn how many people do not understand how to put together an effective team. Following are six tips to building a better team.

  1. Screen Potential Teammates – Although you may have an idea of who should be on the team, don’t jump to conclusions. Instead, spend time screening potential teammates. Think beyond simple skill sets they’ll bring to the team and be sure to consider personality. Too many controlling personalities can bog down a team as surely as a team filled with only followers.

  2. Look for a Good Mix of Teammates – As mentioned above, you don’t want a team filled with one personality type. Also mix it up with experience levels and tenure at the organization. Placing new members of the organization on the team can help create solutions that go beyond the organization’s status quo.

  3. Don’t Stop Team Building – Even if you have a superstar team put together, don’t stop team building. Keep your eyes pealed for potential valuable additions to the team. There’s always room for improvement, and a new team member can not only bring fresh ideas but also encourage complacent team members to not rest on their laurels.

  4. Don’t Be Afraid to Make Cuts – Sometimes your initial ideas about what will make a good team just don’t work out. That’s OK! Don’t be afraid to pull some team members off the team and switch them with new members. Sometimes making a better team is a process of trial and error.

  5. Set Clearly Defined Goals – If you want to build a better team, you have to make sure they understand why they’re on the team. You can have the best team possible, but if they don’t know what exactly they’re supposed to be doing and by when, it’ll be impossible for them to work effectively and efficiently.

  6. Empower the Team – Give your team the power to make the decisions needed to complete their goals. If they have the responsibility to accomplish goals, they should be given the responsibility to handle the interim decisions to get to those goals. It’s the key to helping you build a better team.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

Stop Procrastination – Now!

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

Procrastination makes easy things hard, hard things harder.
~ Mason Cooley

Procrastination is that sinister and seductive stealer of time. We have projects we know need to get done; however, we just can’t bring ourselves to get motivated to actually do them. We put these tasks off, telling ourselves will do them later and all will be OK.

The problem?

Later we have even more responsibilities that need to be taken care of, and our already full plate becomes even fuller. Soon, the work load seems insurmountable. Procrastination takes this opportunity to snowball our lack of motivation, and it becomes an increasingly vicious cycle. Following are six tips on how to stop procrastination – now!

  1. Give Yourself Permission to Work in an Imperfect World – If you’re waiting for just the right time, place, equipment, etc. to begin a project, guess what? That’s procrastination! Don’t wait around for the world to align and give you everything you need to get started on a project. Instead, dive in and get started. Gather the materials you need, as you need them.

  2. Make a Prioritized To Do List – There’s a reason why Daytimer and other planner companies are still successful – they work! Prioritizing a To Do list helps procrastination in a couple of different ways. First, it helps you take stock of what you need to get done, and gives you motivation as you check completed items off your list. Second, by prioritizing the tasks, putting the most important ones first, you can help ensure procrastination doesn’t lead you to the easy or fun (but unimportant) tasks first.

  3. Don’t Kid Yourself – That whole, “I just work better under pressure” statement is often procrastination tricking you into putting off things you really need to get done now! Working under pressure usually means more errors and lower productivity.

  4. Use a Timer – If you’re working on something you truly dread, set a timer and agree to work solely on that project for a certain amount of time. Once that allotted time is over, give yourself a little reward, like a walk outside or ten minutes on Facebook. Breaking up a large, unpleasant project into smaller pieces makes it feel a lot less daunting.

  5. Make a Decision and Move Forward – Sometimes decision-making takes time. However, if you have all of the information to make an education decision, don’t procrastinate by second guessing yourself.

  6. Put Away the Distractions – Distractions are procrastination’s evil cousins. This can be technological distractions, such as e-mail, text messages, or social media sites. In these instances, turn off the offending devices or shut down the related programs. Distractions can also be people. If you have a chatty co-worker, don’t be afraid to let them know you have work you need to get done, but would be happy to talk to them as soon as you’re finished.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (971) 212-0479.

Leadership is much more an art, a belief, a condition of the heart, than a set of things to do. The visible signs of artful leadership are expressed, ultimately, in its practice.
~ Max Depree

“Leadership presence” – it’s one of those recent buzzphrases you hear tossed around lately. It sounds fairly straightforward, but what does it mean exactly? It’s one of those nebulous concepts people use and sometimes you wonder if they know really what is involved. In addition to learning what leadership presence is, more importantly, we talk about how to get this elusive quality.

Leadership Presence: What is It?

Although on the surface leadership presence is exactly what the name implies – the unique presence effective leaders have – it goes so much further than just that. Although it can be referred to as that certain je ne sais quoi a charismatic leader has, there are specific qualities that all leaders with true leadership presence personify. These qualities include:

  • Self confidence,

  • Genuineness and the ability to be candid,

  • The ability to convey a vision and garner support for this vision,

  • Active listener,

  • Effective speaking skills,

  • Openness to new ideas,

  • Motivational and inspirational,

  • Empowers others to succeed,

  • Risk taker, and

  • Actively works at branding themselves as an organizational leader.

Leadership Presence: How Do You Get It?

When you have all of the qualities listed above and, perhaps most importantly, actively use these to brand yourself as an organizational leader, you are on your way to developing leadership presence. Some of these qualities are items you can train to master. Others will require you to discover and uncover your innate abilities.

Becoming an active listener is a skill you can learn, as an example. There are lots of resources (including articles on this site!) to help you hone your listening skills. If you’re not an effective speaker, there are resources, seminars and organizations who can help you in this area too. Visit the “topics” section of my website, www.bouncebackhigher.com/topics, where I offer presentation skills training, as well as one-on-one speech coaching. In contrast to these learned skills, some will need you to simply consciously make an effort to express these qualities.

Being open to new ideas, for instance, may be difficult for you, if you’re used to being in charge and making most of the decisions for your organization. Risk taking may also be a challenge, if you’re naturally more conservative. However, in these instances, sometimes you may have to “fake it until you make it.” When others start to buy into your leadership presence, you’ll find qualities like “self confidence” that you have been pretending to have eventually come naturally.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

 

 

 

“People don’t mind being challenged to do better if they know the request is coming from a caring heart.”
~ Ken Blanchard

Indira Gandhi once said, “I suppose leadership at one time meant muscles; but today it means getting along with people.” This has never been more true. Successful business leaders know although you can manage people by simply giving orders, only through caring about your employees will you take that next step in management evolution, from managing people to leading people.

As James Kouzes and Barry Posner wrote in their book, Encouraging the Heart, “All things being equal, we will work harder and more effectively for people we like. And we like them in direct proportion to how they make us feel.” Following are four ways you can help develop yourself as a caring leader, creating trust and loyalty in the process.

Evolving from Managing People to Leading People

  1. Start off on the Right Foot. At the beginning of each workday, make it a point to speak with your employees. This sounds like common sense but common sense isn’t always commonly applied! For example, compliment them on their successes early in the day, and you’ll see a more positive attitude and greater productivity throughout the workday.
  2. Recognize and Personalize Their Successes. It’s not a new concept to praise and reward your employees for a job well done; however, make sure this recognition is both public and personal. This doesn’t have to be a formal celebration, but it should give your employees a time to focus on the success of their team member. A pizza party or a cake, for reaching a small goal can really keep a team motivated and show you appreciate their hard work.
  3. Take Advantage of the Afternoon Lull. There’s a reason energy drinks use the 3 o’clock hour as an example of when people need a pick-me-up, it’s the time when many employees feel their energy and motivation drop. Take advantage of the afternoon lull, and walk around your employees, asking them how things are going. It’ll not only motivate them to keep productivity going, but will also show them you care about them.
  4. Be Friendly. Although it’s difficult sometimes to draw the line between friendship and boss-employee relationship, this doesn’t mean you can’t be friendly with your employees. Be easy to laugh with your employees. Take note of things in their personal life, such as a new addition to their family or a sick family member, and inquire when appropriate.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

6 Leadership Styles and When They Should be Used

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

My own definition of leadership is this: The capacity and the will to rally men and women to a common purpose and the character which inspires confidence.
~ General Montgomery

Effective leaders know there is not a “one-size-fits-all” leadership style to use for every situation. Leaders, like organizations, must be flexible and nimble. They must adjust to fit the needs of the people they are leading and the challenges and opportunities affecting the organization, at any given time. Following are six leadership styles and when they should be used. Mastering these leadership styles, and using and combining them to their maximum potential, will help propel you from a great leader to a truly exceptional leader!

  • The Affiliative Style – The affiliative style of leadership uses the collaborative power of teamwork and works to form bonds among team members and build trust within the group. This style is best when group harmony is needed and teams are the most effective means of accomplishing organizational goals.

  • The Coaching Style – The coaching style of leadership is a one-on-one leadership style. This leadership style is effective for times when you want to develop the skills or knowledge of a specific employee. The challenge with this style of leadership, however, is to prevent it from being seen as micromanagement. Instead, approach this style as more of a mentorship relationship with the employee.

  • The Democratic Style – The democratic leadership style taps into the power of your employees, using their collective wisdom and experience to help make decisions and decide on direction. One of the benefits of the democratic style is it naturally creates group buy-in on the decisions that are made. However, when a quick decision is made, waiting for a consensus from the group, with the democratic style, may not be the most efficient form of leadership.

  • The Visionary Style – As the name implies, the visionary style of leadership centers on developing and promoting the vision for the organization. This is the style you should use when you need to move your organization in a new direction. This style of leadership doesn’t worry about the details about how the organization will get to their new destination, but instead focuses on where they are going and exciting others about this new destination.

  • The Pacesetting Style – “Do as I say AND as I do!” is the motto of the pacesetting leader. This leadership style is effective when you can be a role model for employees on how to exceed expectations and really go above and beyond in your duties. The primary challenge with this style is it can lower the morale of your employees, if you’re constantly outshining them.

  • The Commanding or Coercive Style – Again, the name says it all in this style of leadership. Using the commanding leadership style is a simple “do as your told” style. Militaristic in approach, this style is typically the least effective. This may be an appropriate style when there’s an organizational crisis or when no other methods have worked with a difficult employee.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

What is Values-Based Leadership?

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013


“(Y)our leadership must be rooted in who you are and what matters most to you. When you truly know yourself and what you stand for, it is much easier to know what to do in any situation.”

~ Harry Jansen Kraemer, Jr.

Values-based leadership (VBL) is one of those buzzphrases of the 21st century business world tossed about, but many don’t understand what it really means. The concept behind values-based leadership is important though – too important! When employed correctly, values-based leadership can transform an organization. It can take widely disparate organizational pieces and guide them into one cohesive, vision-following unit!

What exactly is this powerful values-based leadership?

Values-Based Leadership Overview

Values-based leadership centers on influencing the inter-organizational relationships between individuals, teams, and organizational communities, through decisions and actions formed by consistent values, which balance both the common good of the organization and the healthy self-interest of the individual.

As James O’Toole notes:

[Leadership is] about creating a values-based umbrella large enough to accommodate the various interests of followers, but focused enough to direct their energies in pursuit of a common good. In practical business terms, it’s about creating the conditions under which all followers can perform independently and effectively toward a single objective.

Four Principles of Values-Based Leadership

In his book, From Values to Action: The Four Principles of Values-Based Leadership, Harry Jansen Kraemer, Jr. identifies four key principles to VBL that help flesh out the concept even further. These four principles are:

  1. Self-reflection – Identify what your values personally are – what matters to you most. Values-based leaders are constantly striving for greater self-awareness, with the understanding that only by knowing yourself can you lead yourself, and only by leading yourself can you hope to lead others.

  2. Balance – Values-based leaders are able to see a situation from all sides. They keep an open mind, before making a decision and taking action. This ability to see a situation from multiple perspectives allows them to have a greater understanding of the situation at hand.

  3. True self confidence – When you are truly self confident, you accept yourself for who you are. You understand both your strengths and your weaknesses, while striving to continually improve. Values-based leaders with true self-confidence know there will always be people who are better at things, more accomplished, etc., but they’re alright with that and with who they are!

  4. Genuine humility – Values-based leaders have genuine humility. They know who they are and where they came from. This humility helps them keep perspective, and remain true to their values, even when they achieve success.

When you employ these four principles of VBL, and focus on balancing the good of the organization with the good of the individual, while staying true to your values, you’ll have become a values-based leader!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.


“A company’s culture is often buried so deeply inside rituals, assumptions, attitudes, and values that it becomes transparent to an organization’s members only when, for some reason, it changes.”

~Rob Goffee

Organizational culture is an interdependent set of goals, values, visions, processes, attitudes, assumptions, and roles. When a leader wishes to make a change to the organizational culture, this can be one of the most difficult undertakings. The interdependent facets of the culture serve to reinforce themselves and actively work to prevent change. Following are four common mistakes made when changing organizational culture.

  1. Relying on coercion – One of the most common mistakes leaders make when trying to change an organization’s culture is the use of coercion to garner buy-in and acceptance from their employees. You can’t force people to think or feel a certain way. Instead, you should foster the acceptance of the change by sharing your vision of the new organizational culture and inspiring them to accept it voluntarily. Allow them to envision what the future of the organization will be like once the new organizational culture is in place, and the benefits this new culture will bring for not only the organization but themselves as well!
  2. Failure to use management tools – For those who have inspired their employees to accept and support this organizational culture change, the second most common mistake is failure to put in place management tools that will help facilitate the cultural change. These management tools need to support the new goals, values, visions, processes, attitudes, assumptions, and roles of the new culture. From new role definitions to new measurement and control systems, without these tools in place, the changes made will likely be short-lived.
  3. Lack of communication – As with any change management strategy, communication is key, yet it is surprising lack of communication is still a common mistake. For changing organizational culture, this communication shouldn’t just be top-down communication. Instead, communication should be handled horizontally and with discussions rather than demands. Continue to share and discuss the new culture and the vision of this new culture, reinforcing its value to the entire organization and each individual.
  4. Starting too harshly – Although you may be eager to get the new organizational culture in place, don’t go at it like a bull in a China shop. Don’t immediately start by reorganizing the company. This will only serve to cause people to dig their heels in deeper and work against the cultural change you’re trying to implement. Also, bringing in a new team of executives right off the bat will sour people on the cultural change, as they feel their position within the organization and potential advancement are threatened. However, the one thing you DO want to do quickly is put in place the new systems and processes to support the new cultural vision. Don’t hesitate on that aspect, or you will see your unsupported cultural change falter!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.