To schedule Colleen, please call:
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How to Supervise Employees in the Workplace

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.  ~Jack Welch

Many managers and supervisors are promoted to leadership positions based on their “hard skills” or technical expertise. Yet, they haven’t had management training. The skills that got them promoted aren’t the ones they’ll need in managing people, especially the difficult ones. In order to be a successful leader (and not feel like a babysitter or referee), solid soft skills are essential in effectively supervising employees in the workplace. Incorporating the following skills will ensure that managers have all the abilities they need to meet any challenge.

Being Fair-Minded When Resolving Conflicts

If all the employees feel like they are treated fairly when a conflict arises then they will be less likely to complain. Being fair-minded means hearing everyone’s concerns, reviewing the information and then making a choice based on the facts. The final decision will be the best course of action for the company without favoritism towards anyone. This neutral approach will demonstrate how conflicts are reasonably resolved using a thoughtful manner.

Actively Listening to the Employee’s Concerns

If there’s one topic I frequently discuss in my seminars on how to supervise employees in the workplace, it’s active listening. One of the best ways to supervise employees is to actively listen to them. This means not just “hearing” the words that are spoken but also noticing their behavior when they are expressing their viewpoint. When someone feels like they are truly being heard they also feel they are valued as a person and what they are saying is important. Restating what has been said back to the employees you are supervising will create an atmosphere of understanding that will be appreciated.

Communicating Clear and Comprehensive Messages

When managers have to deliver bad news to their employees it must be a clear and comprehensive message. The last thing that a manager wants is confusion which will promote inaccurate information that spreads throughout an organization! Even if their employees don’t like changes coming from the corporate office, at least they’ll respect the manager who is willing to explain the situation. They also appreciate when their manager “goes to bat” for them by making it clear to everyone how they fully support their proposed initiatives.

Knowing How to Show Appreciation and Give Credit

When managers effectively supervise their employees they understand what will motivate them to produce the best results. If you only wanted one quick tip on how to supervise employees in the workplace, I’d say acknowledge their contributions by publicly or privately thanking them. If it is also possible to give the supervised employees a monetary incentive or other recognition–such as paid time off–this will encourage others to follow their example. Most of the time just giving employees the earned and deserved credit for their efforts will make them feel appreciated and valued.

By incorporating these people skills, supervising employees will become a pleasure rather than a burden. Most of  the time these supervised employees just want to know they are working on a level playing field, being understood, receiving information they need and are greatly appreciated for their hard work. When these techniques are implemented, supervised employees become more productive and will model these behaviors to others encouraging teamwork that gets results.

 

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

If you would like more information on Colleen’s keynotes, breakout sessions and seminars on how to supervise employees in the workplace, please call (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

 

Find Change Agents That Get the Job Done

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

If we don’t change, we don’t grow. If we don’t grow, we aren’t really living. ~ Gail Sheehy

Managing change in organizations is not easy unless you have the right leadership in place. This is why finding the best change agents is essential for ensuring smooth transitions. You want to find people who have the right qualifications to move the company forward successfully. Identifying this type of leadership will make the process less stressful and give you the reassurance that goals will be met. However, finding those who are good at managing change in the workplace will also take some strategic planning. You can start by focusing on the top five qualities listed below to find strong leaders who will guide your company in the right direction.

Change Agents are Willing to Embrace New Ideas

Change is usually met with resistance because people are uncomfortable with the unknown. In my keynotes and seminars on managing change, I hear about it all the time! While this is to be expected, your change agents must not have this attitude. You want to find people who are excited about new ideas and willing to implement them with enthusiasm. Otherwise, you will have leaders who sabotage the process along the way. You also want change agents to be fully committed without any apprehension on their part. This will set the tone for others who are following these leaders and encourage them to work together toward the new goals.

Leaders Believe in the Big Picture of Growth

Managing change in the workplace effectively means that leaders must always have the big picture in their mind. The best companies are the ones that can grow to reflect the needs of their customers. Your employees might be in love with the same software they have used for the last five years; but if it doesn’t serve your increasing global customers, the business will be impacted. Leaders know how implementing changes will make their company grow and thrive. They also have the ability to communicate the big picture to their employees who can be confused and disappointed by new policies. By sharing this overall vision, the change agents will be more respected for making sure everyone understands the importance of the latest modifications.

Striving for Results Fuels Their Motivation

When it comes to managing change in organizations, staying on task is what great change agents do best. They are the first ones to realize that results will fuel their motivation and also increase their employees’ productivity. Especially when the changes that take longer to implement can be frustrating to employees who are relying on workarounds to get things done. Understanding this can happen; effective change agents will highlight benchmarks as progress is being made. They might also propose incentives that encourage their employees to meet milestones sooner which will make the goals more manageable.

Courage Comes Easily to Change Agents

Change agents who show courage will have the easiest time achieving their goals. They know it is not a matter of if a conflict will stand in their path but when it will appear. They are never afraid by this prospect and instead seize the opportunity to obtain a quick resolution. They are also attentive when managing change in the workplace because they know their demeanor is being evaluated by their employees! If they act uncertain or get easily distressed by obstacles, then others will be hesitant in following them. Good change agents know that staying calm and focused on the end result will make each conflict a temporary diversion that can be successfully rectified.

They Gain Trust and Develop Buy-In Successfully

Since change is usually a scary undertaking, employees want to follow people they can trust. When change agents are trusted by their employees, goals align and buy-in is achieved. Even though those relationships take time to establish, leaders can build a solid foundation by regularly communicating to their employees. Change agents will take extra time to share the overall vision and identify each employee’s specific role in achieving successful results. They will also select leaders within each group to assist them in establishing buy-in. This will reinforce the idea that employees are part of the change instead of something randomly happening to them.

Managing change in organizations takes the right leaders, process and perseverance to succeed. When all of these components are applied correctly you will develop an organization that not only survives transitions but also prospers. Hang in there!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

Managing Conflict in the Workplace

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. ~ Thomas Paine

One of the most frequent questions I get asked is, “What are some tips for managing conflict in the workplace?” This is because most managers want to know how to fend off major issues before they escalate. And even in the most congenial work environment, conflicts will occur. But this doesn’t have to create a sense of impending doom! When you effectively use the energy from conflicts in the workplace they also have the ability to transform your problems into opportunities. In fact, by incorporating the following steps your conflicts can become more manageable and take your problem solving methods to a whole new level.

Cool Heads Prevail During Times of Conflict in the Workplace

Conflicts get messy and complicated when they are steeped with emotion. Why? Both sides are passionate about their point of view and want to win! When someone is personally invested in winning they tend to lose sight of everything else. If things get too heated, this is when business relationships can be severely damaged. Bringing both sides together to discuss issues in a reasonable way will allow solutions to flourish. Additionally, separating the person from the issue will encourage discussion rather than arguments and debates.

When Managing Conflict in the Workplace, Encourage Proactive Problem Solving

When your employees start focusing on proactive solutions that’s when conflicts start to fade and problem solving thrives. Encourage and listen to all ideas and solutions. Create an environment that supports teamwork and discourages superficial criticism. If someone does drift back to their original position, ask them why other options couldn’t be considered. This gives each person a chance to carefully consider their proposals in an objective way.  When managing conflict in the workplace, the more reasonable you are in finding solutions, the better opportunity you will have in garnering a compromise.

Objectively Analyze the Situation

It’s easy to have lots of ideas but finding out how viable they are usually takes extensive research. Ask your employees to get more details about costs, timelines and contingency plans. This will also give them the ability to see if a particular process is possible while they are looking for the best solution. Encouraging your employees to fill in these details also fosters ownership of the process. As they gain perspective, some of their original objections will be resolved and lose their power in preventing progress.

Find Out What Works and Build From There

As employees go through the conflict resolution process they will discover that cooperation is the best path towards successful results. When they demonstrate good teamwork, tell them specifically what actions you appreciate. Giving this consistent and positive feedback will likely guide them into a mindset that thinks more about the team and less about their own interests. If they get off track a bit, then point out why the goal of resolving the issue is important to the organization.

As a motivational speaker, I see many employees who think they are a team when in fact they are just a work group. They haven’t been coached into a “we” mentality. One of the keys to successfully managing conflict in the workplace is steering them away from the “me” mindset.

Have a Definite Resolution

You might encounter a situation where multiple solutions are equally good. However, if they all can’t be implemented then a choice has to be made. Often, your leadership position gives you the advantage of knowing what upper management would support. Once the final choice is made, briefly explain your reasons to your employees and stick to your decision. When managing conflict in the workplace, consistency is key. Unresolved conflicts will keep things unsettled, you’ll appear passive, and nothing will move forward. Even if the final choice isn’t celebrated by everyone, at least it gives closure to the conflict and that will be appreciated by the majority.

Managing conflict in  the workplace isn’t easy, but with your assistance it can ultimately create a more cooperative, cohesive atmosphere for everyone!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows across the country and has written more than 40+ popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 fun and entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

What to do before quitting your job, tips on interview preparations, what employers are saying about the resume before the interview, how to get a great job, how to get your dream job, what employers look for on interviews, and what they never want to see.

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You don’t lead by hitting people over the head–that’s assault, not leadership. ~Dwight Eisenhower

The first day a new employee arrives at your office is often mixed with excitement and uncertainty. And you both want the same result — success. But this will only happen if you use your effective leadership skills to initiate the groundwork for developing their unique talents. Starting out on the right foot will give your employee the blueprint they need to be a top contributor and you the reassurance they are following the right path.

Here are five of the most effective ways to start achieving success beginning with their first day:

Make Your Expectations Clear and Detailed

Nothing will make your employee happier than knowing where you stand. Remember, they are working at your company to help you! But in order to achieve your goals they need to know what success looks like in your eyes. During that first meeting be clear about their role in the company, what you are trying to achieve and when it all needs to be accomplished. Don’t be vague. Set clear standards from the beginning and give your employee specific examples they can follow. It will take time to put in this extra effort but you’ll be laying a solid foundation to get the results you really want. In my leadership seminars, one of the most common takeaways is managers realizing they need to set more quantifiable standards for their employees.

Provide a Way to Give and Receive Feedback

Feedback is crucial to ensure the quality of the work you receive. As you are working with your new hire tell them what works well and how they can improve. As the boss, you have the advantage of knowing when something hasn’t worked before and how to quickly resolve those issues. Also, when your employee has questions or concerns tell them how to approach you. Do you have an open door policy? Or do you prefer getting all of their questions in a single email. Determine what process works best for you and clearly communicate your preferences so they can be implemented. It’s one of the secrets to practicing effective leadership.

Managing Conflict in the Workplace

Conflicts come with every project and how you handle it will determine how smoothly things are resolved. Encourage your employees to solve smaller conflicts on their own and be supportive when they need additional leadership from you. When managing conflict in the workplace, actively listen to their concerns and urge their input for a resolution to the situation. If other people are providing the conflict, arrange for a group meeting to discuss the various issues and find common ground. Most importantly, show your employee they have your full support for resolving difficult situations and also troubleshooting any future issues. It’s one of the keys to successfully managing conflict in the workplace.

How to Appreciate and Encourage Employees

Effective leadership means not only pointing out the problems but also the successes. A thoughtful thank you goes a long way to show that you appreciate your employee’s efforts. Being specific about what you liked about their work will inspire the same results later. Additionally, acknowledge when they overcome difficult situations so they can see that you empathize with their struggles. Any opportunity you have to publicly acknowledge their success or give them a special award will also encourage others on your team to achieve similar results. Over time give employees the opportunity to lead and encourage others by becoming a group leader on future projects.

Motivating and Inspiring Employees Toward Top Results

Every employee has a special skill or ability they enjoy doing. It is usually some task they would like to do even if they weren’t  getting paid! It takes effective leadership skills to determine what these abilities are and to assign them to the right person. If you have the choice to give an accounting task to someone who likes doing math problems in their spare time, why not encourage them to crunch some numbers for you? Maybe they would like to get their degree and pursue this type of work in the future. Finding the balance between what is beneficial for your company and the future aspirations of your employee will help both of you achieve success.

Engaging these strategies will help assure the first day with your new employee will be one of many that encourage a solid working relationship that can build and develop in the future!

 

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, Motivational Speaker

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and motivational keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows across the country and has written more than 40+ articles on diverse workplace issues. She has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries.

She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen can assist your organization with successful leadership development through her keynotes, seminars, and workshops. Be sure to visit www.BounceBackHigher.com for details or call (623)340-7690 in Portland, Oregon.

 

 

 

From the overly confident to the overly negative, dealing with difficult personalities is a skill every team member should master.

“Strange is our situation here upon earth. Each of us comes for a short visit, not knowing why, yet sometimes seeming to divine a purpose. From the standpoint of daily life, however, there is one thing we do know: that man is here for the sake of other men.” ~ Albert Einstein

So, you’re on a team. Your team has a mission. The only problem is: your team has people in it. Not just ANY people, people with difficult personalities. You can throw your hands up and scream every time these difficult people rub you the wrong way, or you can learn productive ways of working with them without going insane.

Dealing with Difficult Personalities within a Team? Change Your Own Behavior

Let’s face it; people will not change just because you want them to. As any psychologist will tell you, the only way to change how you feel about a situation (or another person, for that matter) is to change your own behavior in coping. Here are a few examples of difficult personalities and simple ways of dealing with them when working within a team.

The Bully

The Bully is argumentative, aggressive and intimidating. To deal with The Bully, you will need to avoid arguing with him/her while maintaining control of each discussion. Sometimes, in order to maintain control without fueling The Bully’s flame, you will have to state your opinion clearly, succinctly, and directly and ignore their attempts at trapping you into an argument. In dealing with difficult personalities within a team, face the fact that you will not win in a debate with this person. No one will. It is easier not to incite workplace bullies. And workplace bullying is at an all-time high. How do I know? It’s the topic I’m most frequently asked to speak on when I’m a guest on a radio show.

Negative Nelly

Negative Nelly sees the unfavorable in every situation. To them, every idea is bad and every attempt at a solution to a problem will result in a negative outcome. Negative Nelly thrives on when he/she can say the following words: I TOLD YOU SO, or, THAT WON’T WORK. No one likes to hear those words. The best way to deal with this difficult person is to avoid discussing solutions with them. When these situations cannot be avoided, try to remain positive and realistic. Assume Negative Nelly will bring the “I told you so’s” along to every discussion and be prepared not to let them get to you. When I conduct leadership seminars and keynotes for corporations and associations, bosses tell me that one of their biggest frustrations is negativity. It’s easy to see why. If it’s not dealt with, it can become like a cancer that spreads!

The Over Achiever or Know-It-All

The Over Achiever seems to know everything. This “Know-It-All” person can spew out “facts” on any given subject. They are similar to the workplace bullies. The Over Achiever likes to stand in the spotlight and wants everyone to “know” how smart he/she is. Many times, it’s just easier not to get wrapped up in conversation with this person to avoid all the know-it-all-ness about them! But, it can be more productive to admit to yourself  (and to them) that they may actually be a great source of knowledge. Ask a few questions and throw in some praise now and then–sincere praise, of course! you may see that their need to “show off” might dissipate a bit once they realize that others appreciate their knowledge base.

The Non-Team Player

The person within the team who is obviously NOT a team player will be the most difficult personality to deal with. The Non-Team Player is the most destructive person on the team. Again, these people are similar to workplace bullies but in a different, “silent” antagonistic fashion. This person does not share knowledge and does not participate well in open discussions. They always seem to be “doing things” behind everyone’s backs”. Everyone questions the motives of this person. The most effective way of dealing with The Non-Team Player is by kindly questioning them in group discussions. Don’t take “I don’t know” for an answer. Force them to participate by including them as much as possible in all team activities.

Dealing with difficult personalities seems to increase exponentially in difficulty when working within a team. It is important to keep in mind that you are all on the same team working towards the same goal. And most importantly, you all NEED each other. Each individual team member’s skill sets and strengths were sought out for a reason: to complete a team. Learn to appreciate what each person has to offer and to work effectively with those who tend to make things a little difficult at times. It may not be easy at first, but in dealing with difficult personalities within a team, it will certainly help in securing your sanity!

It’s like the old cliche’ goes: It takes all kinds of personalities to make the world go ’round!

It is in how YOU deal with them that defines who YOU are (and how you feel)!

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert, and Motivational Speaker

Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 dynamic and entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

A Portland, Oregon-based motivational speaker, Colleen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

 

 

Four Tips for Selling Change in the Workplace

Friday, August 30th, 2013

Growth demands a temporary surrender of security.
~Gail Sheehy

Change is not only inevitable; it’s necessary! Without change, your organization can’t grow. It can’t take advantage of new opportunities. It can’t remain competitive. However, it’s natural for your employees to fear change. The unknown is scary! To make your organizational change as effectively and efficiently as possible, an important part of managing change is selling change in the workplace. Following are four tips to help make this process easier.

  1. Make Sure Employees are Aware of the Change Necessity. Although the reason for change may be obvious to you, it might not be so obvious to your employees! If you want to sell the change as part of effective change management, make sure you not only tell your employees what the change is going to be, but also tell them the why behind it. Share with them how the change will benefit the organization, as a whole, and even them directly.

  2. Choose the Best Time. Timing is everything – that includes selling change in the workplace. If it can be timed correctly, you’ll minimize the amount of resistance to the impending change. Think about the other things going on in your organization and what key organizational members have on their plates whose buy-in you really need.

  3. Support. Support. Support. There will always be naysayers to any proposed change. The best way to sell change to these folks is to have support to back up the necessity and the value of your proposed change. You can never have too much documentation to support your change. When developing this documentation, try to anticipate what challenges others will bring to light against your organizational change. There are usually always downsides to every change; however, develop support to show that the rewards to the change outweigh any potential downsides.

  4. Be passionate. The best salespeople believe in what they’re selling. This is just as true for selling organizational change as it is for selling tangible products! Be passionate about the change you want to implement and the value it offers the organization. You should be the champion of this change! Your passion, enthusiasm and commitment will be inspirational to others and help make the buy-in to this change that much easier.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

 


Every human being is entitled to courtesy and consideration. Constructive criticism is not only to be expected but sought.

~ Margaret Chase Smith

Part of your job as a manager is to review your employee’s performance. Knowing no one is perfect, this means sometimes you have to give your employees constructive criticism. As well-meaning as your criticism is, chances are the employee may not be completely receptive. In fact, a defensive employee receiving criticism could escalate an already tenuous situation. Following are tips on giving your employees constructive criticism without making the situation worse.

Remember the Constructive Criticism Sandwich

Constructive criticism should be like a delicious sandwich… a slice of soft, fluffy bread, filled with meat, then finished off with another slice of soft, fluffy bread. The soft, fluffy bread is a compliment. Start with telling your employee something that they’re doing right. Everyone likes to hear that they’re doing things right. Starting off with a compliment also let’s your employee know that you do appreciate their efforts and starts the meeting off on a positive note.

The meat of the sandwich is the constructive criticism. This is where you talk about the areas where you’d like to see improvement. Of course, you have to finish with that second piece of fluffy bread – another compliment. This ends the meeting positively, and again reassures the employee that although they have items you’d like them to improve on, you do recognize the areas where they are doing well.

Be Respectful When Giving Constructive Criticism

When delivering the meat of that sandwich, keep your comments respectful. Watch the tone you take. Sometimes criticism, even in its most constructive form, can feel condescending to the employee being critiqued. Keep your comments directed toward actions they can perform to improve the situation. Don’t simply tell them what they’re doing wrong; tell them how to do things right!

Tie Constructive Criticism to the Organizational Mission

To further improve employee buy-in of the changes you’d like made, based on the constructive criticism, tie it into the organizational mission. It’s one of the keys of giving your employees constructive criticism. Don’t simply tell your employee that you want X done differently; explain to them why it’s important to the organization to have it done differently. Then, go one step further and show them how supporting the organizational mission and helping the organization succeed will, in turn, help them succeed.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

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The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.
~Thomas Paine

Employee conflict is inevitable. Put a group of people together and it’s not uncommon for the myriad of personalities to clash from time-to-time. Your main priority when this happens is to manage the employee disagreement without escalating the situation.

Monitoring Employee Disagreements:

Your first duty to managing employee disagreements is to monitor the situation. Even if the dispute seems petty, be aware of what is going on. Keep your eyes and ears on the situation. The employees involved may be able to come to a resolution on their own. In fact, it’s often better if they can come to an understanding on their own; however, if it begins to negatively impact their performance or if there’s a danger the situation may escalate, you’ll want to quickly step in.

Mediation in Employee Disagreements:

If the employee disagreement lingers or escalates, it’s time for you to step in. However, at this point, it’s not your job to make a decision for them. As a mediator, set up a neutral location for the parties involved to discuss the dispute. Set ground rules (such as taking turns speaking) and help everyone involved express their side of the disagreement to one another. Give each party equal time to speak. Let them brainstorm ideas for resolution – something that creates a compromise amongst the parties.

Resolution of Employee Disagreements:

Sometimes an employee disagreement simply can’t come to a resolution by the employees on their own, even with the help of a mediator. This is where you, as the manager, must step in. It is your duty to protect the best interests of your organization, and to come up with a solution to the conflict that is the best strategically for your company. If possible, try to come up with a win-win situation for everyone. This may not be possible though, and it may mean one party is more satisfied with the resolution than the other, or it may mean both parties are unhappy. However, present the solution based on facts and why it’s in the best interest of the organization, and therefore in the best interest of all employees.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.

5 Ways to Strengthen Your Confidence

Friday, August 2nd, 2013

Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.
~ Helen Keller

Although there are those who cross the line from confident into overconfident, many of us still have some challenges with self-confidence, at least at some point in time in our careers. Even if we’re secure in our positions, things can happen that make us doubt ourselves and our abilities. Following our five ways to strengthen your confidence.

  1. Take Stock in Yourself – When self-doubt begins to creep in, honestly take stock in yourself, your experience and your abilities. You’re in the position you’re in because of your hard work and your talents. It’s not a fluke. When new challenges arise that you worry you can’t handle, think back to the other challenges in your past that you’ve overcome. Remind yourself of the times in the past that seemed insurmountable, but you persevered!

  2. Believe in Yourself, Even When You Don’t – There is an old saying – “Fake it until you make it.” When you find your confidence slipping, fake it. Act with confidence, even when you’re not feeling overly confident. Before you know it, the “confidence act” will be reality.

  3. Mitigate Your Weaknesses – No matter how amazing you are, everyone has weaknesses. Its these weaknesses that usually are the biggest source of our insecurities. Acknowledge what areas you’re not as strong in and find ways to address them. This can include delegating tasks to employees who excel in the areas you’re not as strong in, or getting training or education in areas you’d like to be stronger. Both of these can turn your weaknesses into strengths.

  4. Bounce Back When Mistakes Happen – No one is perfect. No one. At some point, we all make mistakes. Don’t let this eat away your self-confidence when mistakes happen. Instead, find out where you went wrong then take steps to not make the same mistake ever again.

  5. Remember to Be Thankful – When insecurity makes you worry if you’re good enough, take a moment to be thankful. Acknowledge and appreciate all of skills and talents you do have. Focusing on the positive and not the negative can help you feel more secure.

About Colleen Kettenhofen, Leadership Expert

CREDENTIALS: Colleen Kettenhofen is an international workplace and employee management expert, award-winning corporate trainer, and conference keynote speaker. A media veteran, she has appeared on numerous radio shows around the country and has written more than 40 popular articles on diverse workplace issues. Colleen has delivered more than 1,100 entertaining programs in 48 states and five countries. She is the author of 10 published audio programs and two books including SECRETS YOUR BOSS ISN’T TELLING YOU.

Colleen Kettenhofen is available for keynotes, breakout sessions, and seminars by calling (623)340-7690.